Faculty

Wright

Fay Wright

APRN-BC PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 914 672 4231

433 First Avenue
New York, NY 10010
United States

expand all
collapse all
Professional overview

Dr. Wright is Assistant Professor of Nursing. She received a B.S.N. and M.S. from University of Michigan School of Nursing, and a Ph.D. from New Your University College of Nursing.

Fay Wright, PhD, RN, APRN-BC joined the Rory Meyers College of Nursing as an assistant professor in 2015, following a T-32 post-doctoral fellowship in Self and Symptom Management at Yale University School of Nursing. Dr. Wright’s research is focused on identifying profiles of patients at risk for higher levels of symptoms with chronic comorbid conditions including cancer, heart disease and diabetes. By developing risk profiles that incorporate demographic, clinical and genomic characteristics, Dr. Wright plans to develop and test precision interventions to support patients’ self-management of symptoms, and to improve their functional status and quality of life. Dr. Wright has experience conducting clinical research within large urban and community hospital settings using quantitative, biobehavioral and mixed method methodology. Her publications identify characteristics of patients at risk for higher levels of fatigue during chemotherapy.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, Dr. Wright the Assistant Director for Evidence-Based Practice and Nursing Research at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt Kisco NY, a clinical assistant professor at Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing, and NYU College of Nursing.

Education
New York University, PhD
New York University, Post-Master's Certificate
University of Michigan School of Nursing, MS
University of Michigan School of Nursing, BSN
Honors and awards
Research Pilot Grant International Society of Nurses in Genetics: Daily Diurnal Fatigue Variability and its Association with Genetic Expression of Inflammasome Pathways $2500 (2017)
T32 Post-doctoral fellowship, National Institute of Nursing Research (2017)
Intramural Research Training Award: Precision Health Boot Camp. National Institute of Nursing (2016)
Intramural Research Training Award: Summer genetics Institute. National Institute of Nursing. (2015)
Summer Genetics Institute. Intramural Research Training Award National Institute of Nursing Research. (2015)
Valedictorian PhD Program New York University College of Nursing (2015)
Distinguished PhD Student New York University College of Nursing (2015)
Best Dissertation Award New York University College of Nursing (2015)
Evidence-Based Practice Excellence Award Maintaining Normothermia in Perioperative Patients Foundation of New York State Nurses Association (2012)
Evidence-Based Practice Excellence Award: Developing an Evidence-based Protocol for Sedation in Mechanically Ventilated Critical Care Patients Foundation of New York State Nurses Association (2011)
Professional membership
Eastern Nursing Research Society (Chronic Comorbid Conditions Research Interest Group Co-Chair)
Sigma Theta Tau
Oncology Nursing Society
American Nurses Association
Association of New York State Nurses
Publications

Characteristics associated with inter-individual differences in the trajectories of self-reported attentional function in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy.

Shih, J., Leutwyler, H., Ritchie, C., Paul, S. M., Levine, J. D., Cooper, B., … Miaskowski, C. (2017). Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 25, (783-793). 10.1007/s00520-016-3461-2
Abstract

Between 14 and 85 % of patients report noticeable changes in cognitive function during chemotherapy (CTX). The purposes of this study were to determine which demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with inter-individual variability in initial levels of attentional function as well as with changes in the trajectories of attentional function in a sample of oncology patients who received two cycles of CTX.

Common and Distinct Characteristics Associated With Trajectories of Morning and Evening Energy in Oncology Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

Abid, H., Kober, K. M., Smoot, B., Paul, S. M., Hammer, M., Levine, J. D., … Miaskowski, C. (2017). Journal of pain and symptom management 53, (887-900.e2). 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.12.339
Abstract

Although energy conservation strategies are recommended in clinical practice guidelines, little is known about changes in energy levels in oncology patients undergoing cancer treatment.

Inflammatory pathway genes associated with inter-individual variability in the trajectories of morning and evening fatigue in patients receiving chemotherapy.

Wright, F., Hammer, M., Paul, S. M., Aouizerat, B. E., Kober, K. M., Conley, Y. P., … Miaskowski, C. (2017). Cytokine 91, (187-210). 10.1016/j.cyto.2016.12.023
Abstract

Fatigue, a highly prevalent and distressing symptom during chemotherapy (CTX), demonstrates diurnal and interindividual variability in severity. Little is known about the associations between variations in genes involved in inflammatory processes and morning and evening fatigue severity during CTX. The purposes of this study, in a sample of oncology patients (N=543) with breast, gastrointestinal (GI), gynecological (GYN), or lung cancer who received two cycles of CTX, were to determine whether variations in genes involved in inflammatory processes were associated with inter-individual variability in initial levels as well as in the trajectories of morning and evening fatigue. Patients completed the Lee Fatigue Scale to determine morning and evening fatigue severity a total of six times over two cycles of CTX. Using a whole exome array, 309 single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs among the 64 candidate genes that passed all quality control filters were evaluated using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Based on the results of the HLM analyses, the final SNPs were evaluated for their potential impact on protein function using two bioinformational tools. The following inflammatory pathways were represented: chemokines (3 genes); cytokines (12 genes); inflammasome (11 genes); Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT, 10 genes); mitogen-activated protein kinase/jun amino-terminal kinases (MAPK/JNK, 3 genes); nuclear factor-kappa beta (NFkB, 18 genes); and NFkB and MAP/JNK (7 genes). After controlling for self-reported and genomic estimates of race and ethnicity, polymorphisms in six genes from the cytokine (2 genes); inflammasome (2 genes); and NFkB (2 genes) pathways were associated with both morning and evening fatigue. Polymorphisms in six genes from the inflammasome (1 gene); JAK/STAT (1 gene); and NFkB (4 genes) pathways were associated with only morning fatigue. Polymorphisms in three genes from the inflammasome (2 genes) and the NFkB (1 gene) pathways were associated with only evening fatigue. Taken together, these findings add to the growing body of evidence that suggests that morning and evening fatigue are distinct symptoms.

Predictors of the multidimensional symptom experience of lung cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

Wong, M. L., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B. A., Dunn, L. B., Hammer, M. J., Conley, Y. P., … Miaskowski, C. (2017). Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 25, (1931-1939). 10.1007/s00520-017-3593-z
Abstract

Few studies have examined interindividual variability in the symptom experience of lung cancer patients. We aimed to identify the most prevalent, severe, and distressing symptoms, and risk factors associated with increased symptom burden.

Age differences in fatigue, decrements in energy, and sleep disturbance in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy.

Bischel, L. E., Ritchie, C., Kober, K. M., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B. A., Chen, L. M., … Miaskowski, C. (2016). European journal of oncology nursing : the official journal of European Oncology Nursing Society 23, (115-23). 10.1016/j.ejon.2016.07.002
Abstract

The number of older adults with cancer is increasing. Given the limited amount of research and the inconsistent findings regarding age differences in common physical symptoms associated with cancer and its treatments, the purposes of this study, in a sample of oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (CTX), were to evaluate for age differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as in occurrence rates of and severity ratings for fatigue, decrements in energy, and sleep disturbance. In addition, using regression analysis techniques, within and across age groups, demographic and clinical characteristics associated with the severity of each symptom were evaluated.

Comparison of subgroups of breast cancer patients on pain and co-occurring symptoms following chemotherapy.

Langford, D. J., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B., Kober, K. M., Mastick, J., Melisko, M., … Miaskowski, C. (2016). Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 24, (605-614). 10.1007/s00520-015-2819-1
Abstract

The purposes of this study, in a sample of women with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy (CTX), were to identify subgroups of women with distinct experiences with the symptom cluster of pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and depressive symptoms and evaluate differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, differences in psychological symptoms, and differences in pain characteristics among these subgroups.

Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

Posternak, V., Dunn, L. B., Dhruva, A., Paul, S. M., Luce, J., Mastick, J., … Miaskowski, C. (2016). Pain 157, (892-900). 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000456
Abstract

The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

Factors associated with oncology patients' involvement in shared decision making during chemotherapy.

Colley, A., Halpern, J., Paul, S., Micco, G., Lahiff, M., Wright, F., … Dunn, L. B. (2016). Psycho-oncology 10.1002/pon.4284
Abstract

Oncology patients are increasingly encouraged to play an active role in treatment decision making. While previous studies have evaluated relationships between demographic characteristics and decision-making roles, less is known about the association of symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics (eg, coping styles and personality traits) and decision-making roles.

Gene Expression Profiling of Evening Fatigue in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

Kober, K. M., Dunn, L., Mastick, J., Cooper, B., Langford, D., Melisko, M., … Aouizerat, B. E. (2016). Biological research for nursing 18, (370-85). 10.1177/1099800416629209
Abstract

Moderate-to-severe fatigue occurs in up to 94% of oncology patients undergoing active treatment. Current interventions for fatigue are not efficacious. A major impediment to the development of effective treatments is a lack of understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying fatigue. In the current study, differences in phenotypic characteristics and gene expression profiles were evaluated in a sample of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (CTX) who reported low (n = 19) and high (n = 25) levels of evening fatigue. Compared to the low group, patients in the high evening fatigue group reported lower functional status scores, higher comorbidity scores, and fewer prior cancer treatments. One gene was identified as upregulated and 11 as downregulated in the high evening fatigue group. Gene set analysis found 24 downregulated and 94 simultaneously up- and downregulated pathways between the two fatigue groups. Transcript origin analysis found that differential expression (DE) originated primarily from monocytes and dendritic cell types. Query of public data sources found 18 gene expression experiments with similar DE profiles. Our analyses revealed that inflammation, neurotransmitter regulation, and energy metabolism are likely mechanisms associated with evening fatigue severity; that CTX may contribute to fatigue seen in oncology patients; and that the patterns of gene expression may be shared with other models of fatigue (e.g., physical exercise and pathogen-induced sickness behavior). These results suggest that the mechanisms that underlie fatigue in oncology patients are multifactorial.

Maintaining Perioperative Normothermia: Sustaining an Evidence-Based Practice Improvement Project.

Levin, R. F., Wright, F., Pecoraro, K., & Kopec, W. (2016). AORN journal 103, (213.e1-213.e13). 10.1016/j.aorn.2015.12.020
Abstract

Unintentional perioperative hypothermia has been shown to cause serious patient complications and, thus, to increase health care costs. In 2009, an evidence-based practice improvement project produced a significant decrease in unintentional perioperative hypothermia in colorectal surgical patients through monitoring of OR ambient room temperature. Project leaders engaged all interdisciplinary stakeholders in the original project, which facilitated the sustainability of the intervention method. An important aspect of sustainability is ongoing monitoring and evaluation of a new intervention method. Therefore, continued evaluation of outcomes of the protocol developed in 2009 was scheduled at specific time points after the initial small test of change with colorectal patients. This article focuses on how attention to sustainability factors during implementation of an improvement project led to the sustainability of a protocol for monitoring OR ambient room temperature with all types of surgical patients five years after the initial project.

Subgroups of chemotherapy patients with distinct morning and evening fatigue trajectories.

Kober, K. M., Cooper, B. A., Paul, S. M., Dunn, L. B., Levine, J. D., Wright, F., … Miaskowski, C. (2016). Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 24, (1473-85). 10.1007/s00520-015-2895-2
Abstract

Purposes of this study were to identify subgroups of patients with distinct trajectories for morning and evening fatigue, evaluate for differences in demographic and clinical characteristics among these subgroups, and compare and contrast the predictors of subgroup membership for morning and evening fatigue.

Glycosylated Hemoglobin A1c and Lack of Association With Symptom Severity in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy for Solid Tumors.

Hammer, M. J., Aouizerat, B. E., Schmidt, B. L., Cartwright, F., Wright, F., & Miaskowski, C. (2015). Oncology nursing forum 42, (581-90). 10.1188/15.ONF.581-590
Abstract

To assess the effects of high blood sugar at the levels of diabetic or prediabetic states during cancer treatment because patients undergoing chemotherapy (CTX) experience multiple symptoms that vary among individuals and may be affected by glucose levels.

Predictors and Trajectories of Morning Fatigue Are Distinct From Evening Fatigue.

Wright, F., D'Eramo Melkus, G., Hammer, M., Schmidt, B. L., Knobf, M. T., Paul, S. M., … Miaskowski, C. (2015). Journal of pain and symptom management 50, (176-89). 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.02.016
Abstract

Fatigue is the most common symptom in oncology patients during chemotherapy. Little is known about the predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of morning fatigue severity in these patients.

Predictors and Trajectories of Morning Fatigue Are Distinct From Evening Fatigue.

Wright, F., Melkus, G.D., Hammer, M., Schmidt, B., Knobf, T., Paul, S.M., Cartwright, F.,
Mastick, J., Cooper, B.A., Chen, L., Melisko, M., Kober, K., Aouizerat, B., & Miaskowsi,
C.
(2015). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 50, (176-89). 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.02.016

Self-Management for Patients with Cancer: An Integrative Review.

Hammer M., Ercolano E., Wright, F., Dickson V., Chyun D., & Melkus G. (2015). Cancer Nursing, 38, (10-26.). 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000122

Trajectories of Evening Fatigue in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy.

Wright, F., D'Eramo Melkus, G., Hammer, M., Schmidt, B. L., Knobf, M. T., Paul, S. M., … Miaskowski, C. (2015). Journal of pain and symptom management 50, (163-75). 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.02.015
Abstract

Fatigue is a distressing persistent sense of physical tiredness that is not proportional to a person's recent activity. Fatigue impacts patients' treatment decisions and can limit their self-care activities. Although significant interindividual variability in fatigue severity has been noted, little is known about predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of evening fatigue severity in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy.

Trajectories of Evening Fatigue in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy.

Wright, F., Melkus, G.D., Hammer, M., Schmidt, B., Knobf, T., Paul, S.M., Cartwright, F.,
Mastick, J., Cooper, B.A., Chen, L., Melisko, M., Kober, K., Aouizerat, B., &
Miaskowsi, C.
(2015). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 50, (163-75. ). 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.02.015

Disease and treatment characteristics do not predict symptom occurrence profiles in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy.

Miaskowski, C., Cooper, B. A., Melisko, M., Chen, L. M., Mastick, J., West, C., … Aouizerat, B. E. (2014). Cancer 120, (2371-8). 10.1002/cncr.28699
Abstract

A large amount of interindividual variability exists in the occurrence of symptoms in patients receiving chemotherapy (CTX). The purposes of the current study, which was performed in a sample of 582 oncology outpatients who were receiving CTX, were to identify subgroups of patients based on their distinct experiences with 25 commonly occurring symptoms and to identify demographic and clinical characteristics associated with subgroup membership. In addition, differences in quality of life outcomes were evaluated.

Media