Faculty

Jacquelyn Taylor headshot

Jacquelyn Taylor

FAAN FAHA PhD PNP-BC RN

Associate Professor
Vernice D. Ferguson Chair in Health Equity
Director, Meyers Biological Laboratory

1 212 998 5392

433 First Avenue
Room 750
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Jacquelyn Taylor, PhD, RN, PNP-BC, FAHA, FAAN is the inaugural Vernice D. Ferguson Professor in Health Equity. Taylor’s work focuses on the interaction of –omics and social factors that contribute to health disparities for common chronic conditions among underrepresented minority populations in the United States and vulnerable populations abroad. Her current R01 examines the gene-environment and DNAm-environment interactions of perceived racism and discrimination, parenting stress, and maternal mental health on blood pressure on African American mothers and their young children. Dr. Taylor is also conducting a study on the genomics of lead poisoning in Flint, MI. She was recently awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) by President Barack Obama, the highest honor awarded by the federal government to scientists and engineers, where she will examine next-generation sequencing-environment interactions on blood pressure among African Americans. Her long-term goals are to develop nursing interventions to reduce and prevent omic-environment risks associated with health disparities in diverse populations across the lifespan.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, Dr. Taylor was Associate Professor with Tenure and Associate Dean of Diversity and Inclusion at the Yale School of Nursing.

Education:

She received a B.S.N., M.S.N. (Pediatric Nurse Practitioner), and Ph.D., from Wayne State University College of Nursing in Detroit. Dr. Taylor also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Urban Health Aging at the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology. Dr. Taylor has completed additional training in Molecular Genetics at Georgetown University and Cardiovascular Genetic Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis.

InterGEN Study Website

FlintGEMS Study Website

 

Publications can be found on the Google Scholar and/or MyNCBI links below.

Google Scholar page

MyNCBI page

Education

Ph.D. Wayne State University
M.S.N. Wayne State University
B.S.N. Wayne State University

Honors and awards

Fellow American Academy of Nursing (2011)
International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) Founders Award for Outstanding Genetics Research and Scholarship (2011)
Fellow American Heart Association (2015)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - MLK Visiting Professor (2015)
The New Haven Club of the The National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women’s Clubs, Inc. Professional Award Recipient (2015)
PECASE: Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2017)
Vernice D. Ferguson Professor in Health Equity Endowed Chair (2018)
Fellow, New York Academy of Medicine (2018)
Mary Mahoney Award- American Nurses Association (2018)

Professional membership

American Academy of Nursing
American Heart Association
International Society of Nurses in Genetics
National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners
Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
New York Academy of Medicine

Publications

Publications

Genomics of reproductive traits and cardiometabolic disease risk in African American Women

Hardy, T. M., De Mendoza, V. B., Sun, Y. V., & Taylor, J. (2019). Nursing Research, 68(2), 135-144. 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000337
Abstract
Background Age at menarche and age at natural menopause occur significantly earlier in African American women than in other ethnic groups. African American women also have twice the prevalence of cardiometabolic disorders related to the timing of these reproductive traits. Objectives The objectives of this integrative review were to (a) summarize the genome-wide association studies of reproductive traits in African American women, (b) identify genes that overlap with reproductive traits and cardiometabolic risk factors in African American women, and (c) propose biological mechanisms explaining the link between reproductive traits and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods PubMed was searched for genome-wide association studies of genes associated with reproductive traits in African American women. After extracting and summarizing the primary genes, we examined whether any of the associations with reproductive traits had also been identified with cardiometabolic risk factors in African American women. Results Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Associations with both reproductive and cardiometabolic traits were reported in or near the following genes: FTO, SEC16B, TMEM18, APOE, PHACTR1, KCNQ1, LDLR, PIK3R1, and RORA. Biological pathways implicated include body weight regulation, vascular homeostasis, and lipid metabolism. Discussion A better understanding of the genetic basis of reproductive traits in African American women may provide insight into the biological mechanisms linking variation in these traits with increased risk for cardiometabolic disorders in this population.

Novel DNA methylation sites associated with cigarette smoking among African Americans

Barcelona, V., Huang, Y., Brown, K., Liu, J., Zhao, W., Yu, M., Kardia, S. L., Smith, J. A., Taylor, J., & Sun, Y. V. (2019). Epigenetics. 10.1080/15592294.2019.1588683
Abstract
Introduction: Cigarette smoking has been associated with adverse health outcomes for mothers and children and is a major contributor to heart disease. Although cigarette smoking is known to affect the epigenome, few studies have been done in African American populations. In this study, we investigated the association between cigarette smoking and DNA methylation (DNAm) among African Americans from the Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure Study (InterGEN), and the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA). Methods: The InterGEN study aims to examine the effects of genetic and psychological factors on blood pressure among African American women and their children. Current cigarette smoking was assessed at baseline. DNAm of saliva was assessed using the 850K EPIC Illumina BeadChip for Epigenome-Wide Association analyses. A replication study was conducted among 1100 participants in the GENOA study using the same BeadChip. Results: After controlling for age, body mass index, population structure and cell composition, 26 epigenome-wide significant sites (FDR q < 0.05) were identified, including the AHRR and PHF14 genes associated with atherosclerosis and lung disease, respectively. Six novel CpG sites were discovered in the InterGEN sample and replicated in the GENOA sample. Genes mapped include RARA, FSIP1, ALPP, PIK3R5, KIAA0087, and MGAT3, which were largely associated with cancer development. Conclusion: We observed significant epigenetic associations between smoking and disease-associated genes (e.g., cardiovascular disease, lung cancer). Six novel CpG sites were identified and replicated across saliva and blood samples.

NuRsing Research in the 21st Century: R You Ready?

Wright, M. L., Higgins, M., Taylor, J., & Hertzberg, V. S. (2019). Biological Research for Nursing, 21(1), 114-120. 10.1177/1099800418810514
Abstract
Nurse scientists are adept at translating findings from basic science into useful clinical- and community-based interventions to improve health. Over time, the focus of some nursing research has grown to include the assessment and evaluation of genomic and other output from high-throughput, or “omic,” technologies as indicators related to health and disease. To date, the growth in the application of omics technologies in nursing research has included calls to increase attention to omics in nursing school curricula and educational training opportunities, such as the Summer Genetics Institute offered by the National Institute of Nursing Research. However, there has been scant attention paid in the nursing literature to the complexity of data analysis or issues of reproducibility related to omics studies. The goals of this article are to (1) familiarize nurse scientists with tools that encourage reproducibility in omics studies, with a focus on the free and open-source data processing and analysis pipeline, and (2) provide a baseline understanding of how these tools can be used to improve collaboration and cohesion among interdisciplinary research team members. Knowledge of these tools and skill in applying them will be important for communication across disciplines and imperative for the advancement of omics research in nursing.

Using Genetic Burden Scores for Gene-by-Methylation Interaction Analysis on Metabolic Syndrome in African Americans

Taylor, J., Ware, E. B., Wright, M. L., Smith, J. A., & Kardia, S. L. (2019). Biological Research for Nursing. 10.1177/1099800419828486
Abstract
With the rapid advancement of omics-based research, particularly big data such as genome- and epigenome-wide association studies that include extensive environmental and clinical variables, data analytics have become increasingly complex. Researchers face significant challenges regarding how to analyze multifactorial data and make use of the findings for clinical translation. The purpose of this article is to provide a scientific exemplar for use of genetic burden scores as a data analysis method for studies with both genotype and DNA methylation data in which the goal is to evaluate associations with chronic conditions such as metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study included 739 African American men and women from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy Study who met diagnostic criteria for MetS and had available genetic and epigenetic data. Genetic burden scores for evaluated genes were not significant after multiple testing corrections, but DNA methylation at 2 CpG sites (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase cg22381196 pFDR =.014; CTNNA3 cg00132141 pFDR =.043) was significantly associated with MetS after controlling for multiple comparisons. Interactions between the marginally significant CpG sites and burden scores, however, were not significant. More work is required in this area to identify intermediate biological pathways influenced by environmental, genetic, and epigenetic variation that may explain the high prevalence of MetS among African Americans. This study does serve, however, as an example of the use of the genetic burden score as an alternative data analysis approach for complex studies involving the analysis of genetic and epigenetic data simultaneously.

Improving -Omics-Based Research and Precision Health in Minority Populations: Recommendations for Nurse Scientists

Taylor, J., & Barcelona De Mendoza, V. (2018). Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 50(1), 11-19. 10.1111/jnu.12358
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of nurse scientists in -omics-based research and to promote discussion around the conduct of -omics-based nursing research in minority communities. Nurses are advocates, educators, practitioners, scientists, and researchers, and are crucial to the design and successful implementation of -omics studies, particularly including minority communities. The contribution of nursing in this area of research is crucial to reducing health disparities. Methods: In this article, challenges in the conduct of -omics-based research in minority communities are discussed, and recommendations for improving diversity among nurse scientists, study participants, and utilization of training and continuing education programs in -omics are provided. Findings and Conclusions: Many opportunities exist for nurses to increase their knowledge in -omics and to continue to build the ranks of nurse scientists as leaders in -omics-based research. In order to work successfully with communities of color, nurse scientists must advocate for participation in the Precision Medicine Initiative, improve representation of nurse faculty of color, and increase utilization of training programs in -omics and lead such initiatives. Clinical Relevance: All nursing care has the potential to be affected by the era of -omics and precision health. By taking an inclusive approach to diversity in nursing and -omics research, nurses will be well placed to be leaders in reducing health disparities through research, practice, and education.

Joint Influence of SNPs and DNA Methylation on Lipids in African Americans From Hypertensive Sibships

Wright, M. L., Ware, E. B., Smith, J. A., Kardia, S. L., & Taylor, J. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 161-167. 10.1177/1099800417752246
Abstract
Introduction: Plasma concentrations of lipids (i.e., total cholesterol, high-density cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, and triglycerides) are amenable to therapeutic intervention and remain important factors for assessing risk of cardiovascular diseases. Some of the observed variability in serum lipid concentrations has been associated with genetic and epigenetic variants among cohorts with European ancestry (EA). Serum lipid levels have also been associated with genetic variants in multiethnic populations. Methods: The purpose of this study was to determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA methylation (DNAm) differences contribute to lipid variation among African Americans ([AAs], N = 739) in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) study. Results: Previous meta-analyses identified 161 SNPs that are associated with lipid traits in populations of EA. We evaluated these SNPs and 66 DNAm sites within the genes containing the SNPs in the GENOA cohort using linear mixed-effects modeling. We did not identify any significant associations of SNPs or DNAm with serum lipid levels. These results suggest that the SNPs identified as being significant for lipid levels through the EA genome-wide association studies may not be significant across AA populations. Conclusions: Reductions in morbidity and mortality due to variation in lipids among AAs may be achieved through a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic factors associated with serum lipid levels for early and appropriate screening. Further large-scale studies specifically within AA and other non-EA populations are warranted.

Joint Influence of SNPs and DNA Methylation on Lipids in African Americans From Hypertensive Sibships.

Wright, M. L., Ware, E. B., Smith, J. A., Kardia, S. L., & Taylor, J. Y. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 161-167. 10.1177/1099800417752246
Abstract
Plasma concentrations of lipids (i.e., total cholesterol, high-density cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, and triglycerides) are amenable to therapeutic intervention and remain important factors for assessing risk of cardiovascular diseases. Some of the observed variability in serum lipid concentrations has been associated with genetic and epigenetic variants among cohorts with European ancestry (EA). Serum lipid levels have also been associated with genetic variants in multiethnic populations.

Nursing genetics and genomics: The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) survey

Hickey, K. T., Taylor, J., Barr, T. L., Hauser, N. R., Jia, H., Riga, T. C., & Katapodi, M. (2018). Nurse Education Today, 63, 12-17. 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.01.002
Abstract
Background: The International Society of Nursing in Genetics (ISONG) fosters scientific and professional development in the discovery, interpretation, and application of genomic information in nursing research, education, and clinical practice. Objectives: Assess genomic-related activities of ISONG members in research, education and practice, and competencies to serve as global leaders in genomics. Design: Cross-sectional survey (21-items) assessing genomic-related training, knowledge, and practice. Settings: An email invitation included a link to the anonymous online survey. Participants: All ISONG members (n = 350 globally) were invited to partake. Methods: Descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test for between-group comparisons. Results: Respondents (n = 231, 66%), were mostly Caucasian, female, with a master's degree or higher. Approximately 70% wanted to incorporate genomics in research, teaching, and practice. More than half reported high genomic competency, and over 95% reported that genomics is relevant the next 5 years. Conclusions: Findings provide a foundation for developing additional educational programs for an international nursing workforce in genomics.

Nursing genetics and genomics: The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) survey.

Hickey, K. T., Taylor, J. Y., Barr, T. L., Hauser, N. R., Jia, H., Riga, T. C., & Katapodi, M. (2018). Nurse Education Today, 63, 12-17. 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.01.002
Abstract
The International Society of Nursing in Genetics (ISONG) fosters scientific and professional development in the discovery, interpretation, and application of genomic information in nursing research, education, and clinical practice.

Perceived Racial Discrimination and DNA Methylation Among African American Women in the InterGEN Study

De Mendoza, V. B., Huang, Y., Crusto, C. A., Sun, Y. V., & Taylor, J. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 145-152. 10.1177/1099800417748759
Abstract
Introduction: Experiences of racial discrimination have been associated with poor health outcomes. Little is known, however, about how perceived racial discrimination influences DNA methylation (DNAm) among African Americans (AAs). We examined the association of experiences of discrimination with DNAm among AA women in the Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure (InterGEN) study. Methods: The InterGEN study examines the effects of genetic and psychological factors on blood pressure among AA women and their children. Measures include the Major Life Discrimination (MLD) and the Race-Related Events (RES) scales. In the present analysis, we examined discrimination and DNAm at baseline in the InterGEN study. The 850K EPIC Illumina BeadChip was used for evaluating DNAm in this epigenome-wide association study (EWAS). Results: One hundred and fifty-two women contributed data for the RES-EWAS analysis and 147 for the MLD-EWAS analysis. Most were 30–39 years old, nonsmokers, had some college education, and had incomes <US$15,000/year. After controlling for age, smoking, and cell composition, MLD was significantly associated with DNAm at nine CpG (regions of DNA where a cytosine nucleotide is followed by a guanine nucleotide) sites (false discovery rate [FDR]-corrected p <.05). For the RES-EWAS analysis, no DNAm sites passed the epigenome-wide significance level after genomic control, though suggestive associations were observed at CpG sites after genomic control (raw p < 10−5). Conclusion: We observed significant epigenetic associations between disease-associated genes (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and asthma) and perceived discrimination as measured by the MLD Scale. Future health disparities research should include epigenetics in high-risk populations to elucidate functional consequences induced by the psychosocial environment.