Faculty

Jacquelyn Taylor headshot

Jacquelyn Taylor

FAAN FAHA PhD PNP-BC RN

Associate Professor
Vernice D. Ferguson Chair in Health Equity

1 212 998 5392

433 First Avenue
Room 422
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Jacquelyn Taylor, PhD, RN, PNP-BC, FAHA, FAAN is the inaugural Vernice D. Ferguson Professor in Health Equity. Taylor’s work focuses on the interaction of –omics and social factors that contribute to health disparities for common chronic conditions among underrepresented minority populations in the United States and vulnerable populations abroad. Her current R01 examines the gene-environment and DNAm-environment interactions of perceived racism and discrimination, parenting stress, and maternal mental health on blood pressure on African American mothers and their young children. Dr. Taylor is also conducting a study on the genomics of lead poisoning in Flint, MI. She was recently awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) by President Barack Obama, the highest honor awarded by the federal government to scientists and engineers, where she will examine next-generation sequencing-environment interactions on blood pressure among African Americans. Her long-term goals are to develop nursing interventions to reduce and prevent omic-environment risks associated with health disparities in diverse populations across the lifespan.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, Dr. Taylor was Associate Professor with Tenure and Associate Dean of Diversity and Inclusion at the Yale School of Nursing.

Education:

She received a B.S.N., M.S.N. (Pediatric Nurse Practitioner), and Ph.D., from Wayne State University College of Nursing in Detroit. Dr. Taylor also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Urban Health Aging at the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology. Dr. Taylor has completed additional training in Molecular Genetics at Georgetown University and Cardiovascular Genetic Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis.

InterGEN Study Website

FlintGEMS Study Website

 

More than 45 publications can be found on the Google Scholar and/or MyNCBI links below.

Google Scholar page

MyNCBI page

Education

Ph.D. Wayne State University
M.S.N. Wayne State University
B.S.N. Wayne State University

Honors and awards

Fellow American Academy of Nursing (2011)
International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) Founders Award for Outstanding Genetics Research and Scholarship (2011)
Fellow American Heart Association (2015)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - MLK Visiting Professor (2015)
The New Haven Club of the The National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women’s Clubs, Inc. Professional Award Recipient (2015)
PECASE: Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2017)
Vernice D. Ferguson Professor in Health Equity Endowed Chair (2018)
Fellow, New York Academy of Medicine (2018)
Mary Mahoney Award- American Nurses Association (2018)

Professional membership

American Academy of Nursing
American Heart Association
International Society of Nurses in Genetics
National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners
Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
New York Academy of Medicine

Publications

Publications

Improving -Omics-Based Research and Precision Health in Minority Populations: Recommendations for Nurse Scientists

Taylor, J. Y., & Barcelona de Mendoza, V. (2018). Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 50(1), 11-19. 10.1111/jnu.12358
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of nurse scientists in -omics-based research and to promote discussion around the conduct of -omics-based nursing research in minority communities. Nurses are advocates, educators, practitioners, scientists, and researchers, and are crucial to the design and successful implementation of -omics studies, particularly including minority communities. The contribution of nursing in this area of research is crucial to reducing health disparities. Methods: In this article, challenges in the conduct of -omics-based research in minority communities are discussed, and recommendations for improving diversity among nurse scientists, study participants, and utilization of training and continuing education programs in -omics are provided. Findings and Conclusions: Many opportunities exist for nurses to increase their knowledge in -omics and to continue to build the ranks of nurse scientists as leaders in -omics-based research. In order to work successfully with communities of color, nurse scientists must advocate for participation in the Precision Medicine Initiative, improve representation of nurse faculty of color, and increase utilization of training programs in -omics and lead such initiatives. Clinical Relevance: All nursing care has the potential to be affected by the era of -omics and precision health. By taking an inclusive approach to diversity in nursing and -omics research, nurses will be well placed to be leaders in reducing health disparities through research, practice, and education.

Joint Influence of SNPs and DNA Methylation on Lipids in African Americans From Hypertensive Sibships

Wright, M. L., Ware, E. B., Smith, J. A., Kardia, S. L., & Taylor, J. Y. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 161-167. 10.1177/1099800417752246
Abstract
Introduction: Plasma concentrations of lipids (i.e., total cholesterol, high-density cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, and triglycerides) are amenable to therapeutic intervention and remain important factors for assessing risk of cardiovascular diseases. Some of the observed variability in serum lipid concentrations has been associated with genetic and epigenetic variants among cohorts with European ancestry (EA). Serum lipid levels have also been associated with genetic variants in multiethnic populations. Methods: The purpose of this study was to determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA methylation (DNAm) differences contribute to lipid variation among African Americans ([AAs], N = 739) in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) study. Results: Previous meta-analyses identified 161 SNPs that are associated with lipid traits in populations of EA. We evaluated these SNPs and 66 DNAm sites within the genes containing the SNPs in the GENOA cohort using linear mixed-effects modeling. We did not identify any significant associations of SNPs or DNAm with serum lipid levels. These results suggest that the SNPs identified as being significant for lipid levels through the EA genome-wide association studies may not be significant across AA populations. Conclusions: Reductions in morbidity and mortality due to variation in lipids among AAs may be achieved through a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic factors associated with serum lipid levels for early and appropriate screening. Further large-scale studies specifically within AA and other non-EA populations are warranted.

Joint Influence of SNPs and DNA Methylation on Lipids in African Americans From Hypertensive Sibships.

Wright, M. L., Ware, E. B., Smith, J. A., Kardia, S. L., & Taylor, J. Y. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 161-167. 10.1177/1099800417752246
Abstract
Plasma concentrations of lipids (i.e., total cholesterol, high-density cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, and triglycerides) are amenable to therapeutic intervention and remain important factors for assessing risk of cardiovascular diseases. Some of the observed variability in serum lipid concentrations has been associated with genetic and epigenetic variants among cohorts with European ancestry (EA). Serum lipid levels have also been associated with genetic variants in multiethnic populations.

Nursing genetics and genomics: The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) survey

Hickey, K. T., Taylor, J. Y., Barr, T. L., Hauser, N. R., Jia, H., Riga, T. C., & Katapodi, M. (2018). Nurse Education Today, 63, 12-17. 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.01.002
Abstract
Background: The International Society of Nursing in Genetics (ISONG) fosters scientific and professional development in the discovery, interpretation, and application of genomic information in nursing research, education, and clinical practice. Objectives: Assess genomic-related activities of ISONG members in research, education and practice, and competencies to serve as global leaders in genomics. Design: Cross-sectional survey (21-items) assessing genomic-related training, knowledge, and practice. Settings: An email invitation included a link to the anonymous online survey. Participants: All ISONG members (n = 350 globally) were invited to partake. Methods: Descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test for between-group comparisons. Results: Respondents (n = 231, 66%), were mostly Caucasian, female, with a master's degree or higher. Approximately 70% wanted to incorporate genomics in research, teaching, and practice. More than half reported high genomic competency, and over 95% reported that genomics is relevant the next 5 years. Conclusions: Findings provide a foundation for developing additional educational programs for an international nursing workforce in genomics.

Nursing genetics and genomics: The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) survey.

Hickey, K. T., Taylor, J. Y., Barr, T. L., Hauser, N. R., Jia, H., Riga, T. C., & Katapodi, M. (2018). Nurse Education Today, 63, 12-17. 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.01.002
Abstract
The International Society of Nursing in Genetics (ISONG) fosters scientific and professional development in the discovery, interpretation, and application of genomic information in nursing research, education, and clinical practice.

Perceived Racial Discrimination and DNA Methylation Among African American Women in the InterGEN Study

De Mendoza, V. B., Huang, Y., Crusto, C. A., Sun, Y. V., & Taylor, J. Y. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 145-152. 10.1177/1099800417748759
Abstract
Introduction: Experiences of racial discrimination have been associated with poor health outcomes. Little is known, however, about how perceived racial discrimination influences DNA methylation (DNAm) among African Americans (AAs). We examined the association of experiences of discrimination with DNAm among AA women in the Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure (InterGEN) study. Methods: The InterGEN study examines the effects of genetic and psychological factors on blood pressure among AA women and their children. Measures include the Major Life Discrimination (MLD) and the Race-Related Events (RES) scales. In the present analysis, we examined discrimination and DNAm at baseline in the InterGEN study. The 850K EPIC Illumina BeadChip was used for evaluating DNAm in this epigenome-wide association study (EWAS). Results: One hundred and fifty-two women contributed data for the RES-EWAS analysis and 147 for the MLD-EWAS analysis. Most were 30–39 years old, nonsmokers, had some college education, and had incomes <US$15,000/year. After controlling for age, smoking, and cell composition, MLD was significantly associated with DNAm at nine CpG (regions of DNA where a cytosine nucleotide is followed by a guanine nucleotide) sites (false discovery rate [FDR]-corrected p <.05). For the RES-EWAS analysis, no DNAm sites passed the epigenome-wide significance level after genomic control, though suggestive associations were observed at CpG sites after genomic control (raw p < 10−5). Conclusion: We observed significant epigenetic associations between disease-associated genes (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and asthma) and perceived discrimination as measured by the MLD Scale. Future health disparities research should include epigenetics in high-risk populations to elucidate functional consequences induced by the psychosocial environment.

Perceived Racial Discrimination and DNA Methylation Among African American Women in the InterGEN Study.

Barcelona-de Mendoza, V., Huang, Y., Crusto, C. A., Sun, Y. V., & Taylor, J. Y. (2018). Biological Research for Nursing, 20(2), 145-152. 10.1177/1099800417748759
Abstract
Experiences of racial discrimination have been associated with poor health outcomes. Little is known, however, about how perceived racial discrimination influences DNA methylation (DNAm) among African Americans (AAs). We examined the association of experiences of discrimination with DNAm among AA women in the Intergenerational Impact of Genetic and Psychological Factors on Blood Pressure (InterGEN) study.

The combined effects of genetic risk and perceived discrimination on blood pressure among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

Taylor, J. Y., Sun, Y. V., De Mendoza, V. B., Ifatunji, M., Rafferty, J., Fox, E. R., Musani, S. K., Sims, M., & Jackson, J. S. (2017). Medicine (United States), 96(43). 10.1097/MD.0000000000008369
Abstract
Both genomics and environmental stressors play a significant role in increases in blood pressure (BP). In an attempt to further explain the hypertension (HTN) disparity among African Americans (AA), both genetic underpinnings (selected candidate genes) and stress due to perceived racial discrimination (as reported in the literature) have independently been linked to increased BP among AAs. Although Gene x Environment interactions on BP have been examined, the environmental component of these investigations has focused more on lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, diet, and physical activity, and less on psychosocial stressors such as perceived discrimination. The present study uses candidate gene analyses to identify the relationship between Everyday Discrimination (ED) and Major Life Discrimination (MLD) with increases in systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) among AA in the Jackson Heart Study. Multiple linear regression models reveal no association between discrimination and BP after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), antihypertensive medication use, and current smoking status. Subsequent candidate gene analysis identified 5 SNPs (rs7602215, rs3771724, rs1006502, rs1791926, and rs2258119) that interacted with perceived discrimination and SBP, and 3 SNPs (rs2034454, rs7602215, and rs3771724) that interacted with perceived discrimination and DBP. Most notably, there was a significant SNP×discrimination interaction for 2 SNPs on the SLC4A5 gene: rs3771724 (MLD: SBP P =.034, DBP P =.031; ED: DBP: P =.016) and rs1006502 (MLD: SBP P=.034, DBP P=.030; ED: DBP P=.015). This study supports the idea that SNP×discrimination interactions combine to influence clinically relevant traits such as BP. Replication with similar epidemiological samples is required to ascertain the role of genes and psychosocial stressors in the development and expression of high BP in this understudied population.

Policy brief: Improve coverage of newborn genetic screening to include the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel and newborn screening registry

Starkweather, A., Coleman, B., Barcelona de Mendoza, V., Fu, M., Taylor, J., Henderson, W., Kenner, C., Walker, D., Amankwaa, L., & Anderson, C. (2017). Nursing Outlook, 65(4), 480-484. 10.1016/j.outlook.2017.04.009

Childbirth and consequent atopic disease: Emerging evidence on epigenetic effects based on the hygiene and EPIIC hypotheses

Dahlen, H. G., Downe, S., Wright, M. L., Kennedy, H. P., & Taylor, J. Y. (2016). BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16(1). 10.1186/s12884-015-0768-9
Abstract
Background: In most high and middle income countries across the world, at least 1:4 women give birth by cesarean section. Rates of labour induction and augmentation are rising steeply; and in some countries up to 50 % of laboring women and newborns are given antibiotics. Governments and international agencies are increasingly concerned about the clinical, economic and psychosocial effects of these interventions. Discussion: There is emerging evidence that certain intrapartum and early neonatal interventions might affect the neonatal immune response in the longer term, and perhaps trans-generationally. Two theories lead the debate in this area. Those aligned with the hygiene (or 'Old Friends') hypothesis have examined the effect of gut microbiome colonization secondary to mode of birth and intrapartum/neonatal pharmacological interventions on immune response and epigenetic phenomena. Those working with the EPIIC (Epigenetic Impact of Childbirth) hypothesis are concerned with the effects of eustress and dys-stress on the epigenome, secondary to mode of birth and labour interventions. Summary: This paper examines the current and emerging findings relating to childbirth and atopic/autoimmune disease from the perspective of both theories, and proposes an alliance of research effort. This is likely to accelerate the discovery of important findings arising from both approaches, and to maximize the timely understanding of the longer-term consequences of childbirth practices.