Faculty

Sherry

Sherry Greenberg

Senior Training Specialist

1 212 992 7347

433 First Avenue
Room 515A
New York, NY 10010
United States

expand all
collapse all
Professional overview

Dr. Sherry Greenberg is the Program Director of the Advanced Certificate in Gerontology Program focusing on the interprofessional primary care to older adults with multiple chronic conditions, and the Program Manager of the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) Long Term Care grant, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation.

Dr. Greenberg earned her academic nursing degrees, Bachelor, Master, and PhD, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and was chosen as a Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholar. Her research focuses on fear of falling in older adults and the relationship with the neighborhood built environment. With over 20 years of experience, Dr. Greenberg has worked as a gerontological nurse practitioner in acute, long-term care, subacute rehabilitation, assisted living, and outpatient primary care practices in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Greenberg has published geriatric-related articles and chapters in journals, books, and online forums and serves as a peer reviewer for multiple journals.

Dr. Greenberg has been an active member of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing since its inception in 1996. Dr. Greenberg is the Editor-in-Chief for The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing’s Try This® Series and serves as a mentor for the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Undergraduate Scholars Program. Dr. Greenberg is involved in multiple Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing grant projects including the Accelerating Interprofessional Community-Based Education and Practice project related to oral health care of older adults and Interprofessional Care of Older Adults in Home Care grant.

Education
BSN, 1990, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
MSN, 1992, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Post-Master’s Certificate in College and University Teaching, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
PhD, 2014, University of Pennsylvania
Honors and awards
Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA) Board of Directors, Director-at-Large (201720182019)
Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA) Foundation Education Poster Award (2016)
Expert Panel Member, National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence’s (NHCGNE) Expert Panel for the development of Gerontological Nurse Educator Competencies (20152016)
Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA) Foundation Research Award for Outstanding Podium Presentation (2013)
Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA) Foundation Research/Project Grant Award (2012)
Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholar (201220132014)
Frank Morgan Jones Research Grant, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing (2012)
Refocusing the Interdisciplinary: Toward Elder Friendly Urban Environments Research Grant (2012)
Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA), NIH/NINR Institutional Research Training Grant (T32- NR009356), Individualized Care for At-Risk Older Adults, NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health and the Center for Integrative Science (200920102011)
Clinical Preceptor Award, New York University College of Nursing (2003)
Dean's Award, University of Pennsylvania MSN graduation (1992)
Sigma Theta Tau, International Honor Society of Nursing Induction (1992)
Specialties
Gerontology
Interprofessionalism
Primary care
Chronic disease
Professional membership
American Association of Nurse Practitioners
American Geriatrics Society
The Nurse Practitioners of New York
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Central NJ Chapter of National Gerontological Nursing Association
New Jersey State Nurses Association
National Gerontological Nursing Association
Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association
Gerontological Society of America
American Nurses Association
Sigma Theta Tau, International Honor Society of Nursing
Publications

A post-master's advanced certificate in gerontology for NPs.

Greenberg, S. A., Squires, A., Adams, J., Altshuler, L., Oh, S. Y., Blachman, N. L., & Cortes, T. A. (2017). The Nurse practitioner 10.1097/01.NPR.0000521992.53558.73
Abstract

This article describes an innovative post-master's advanced certificate in gerontology program developed by the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at the New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The program provides advanced practice registered nurses geriatric content to meet eligibility criteria for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care NP certification exam and develops interprofessional care providers to care for complex older adults.

Chronic Illness and Older Adults

Greenberg, S. A. (2017). Medical-Surgical Nursing: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems (10th Ed.) (pp. 60-76). St. Louis: Elsevier, Inc.

Identifying distinct risk profiles to predict adverse events among community-dwelling older adults

O’Connor, M., Hanlon, A. L., Mauer, E., Meghani, S., Masterson-Creber, R., Marcantonio, S., Coburn, K., Van Cleave, J., Davitt, J., Riegel, B., Bowles, K. H., Keim, S., Greenberg, S. A., Sefcik, J. S., Topaz, M., Kong, D., Naylor, M. D. (2017). Geriatric Nursing Elsevier.

Risk for Falls

Greenberg, S. A. (2017). Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care (11th Ed.) (pp. 355-360). St. Louis: Elsevier, Inc. .

Validating the Health Literacy Promotion Practices Assessment Instrument

Squires, A.P., Yin, H.S., Jones, S.A., Greenberg, S.A., Moore, R., & Cortes, T.A. (2017). HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice 1, (e239-e246). 10.3928/24748307-20171030-01 SLACK, Inc..

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 1: Roles and Responsibilities in Health Care Team Settings

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 2: Effective Health Care Teams

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 3: Teamwork Skills.

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 4: Effective Communication Skills

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 5: Conflict Resolution

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Interprofessional Education and Practice (IPEP) 6: Interprofessional Care Planning.

Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S. Y., Altshuler, L., Blachman, N., Zabar, S. R., Cortes, T., & Adams, J. (2016). In Digga, E. R., NYU Langone Medical Center

Measuring fear of falling among high-risk, urban, community-dwelling older adults.

Greenberg, S. A., Sullivan-Marx, E., Sommers, M. L., Chittams, J., & Cacchione, P. Z. (2016). Geriatric nursing (New York, N.Y.) 37, (489-495). 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2016.08.018
Abstract

Fear of falling (FOF) creates a psychological barrier to performing activities for many older adults. The negative impact of fear of falling increases risk of curtailment of activities, future falls, and injury. The specific aim for this study was to investigate the relationship between two fear of falling measures used in clinical research, the FOF Likert scale and Falls Self Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). The study included a convenience sample of 107 high-risk, community-dwelling, mostly Black (94%) members from one Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly program. The FOF scale is one-item asking to rate overall concern about falling, while the FES-I is 16-items rating concern about falling during physical and social activities. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis were highly significant (F-value = 22.25, R-squared = 0.39, p < 0.0001). The Graded Response Model statistics demonstrated one underlying latent factor, fear of falling. This study supports the use of both tools for thorough FOF measurement.

The 2015 American Geriatrics Society Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults

Greenberg, S. A. (2016). Try This series: Best practice in nursing care to older adults Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing

A pilot study examining health literacy promotion practices among healthcare professionals

Squires, A., Yin, S., Greenberg, S. A., Guiliante, M. M., McDonald, M. V., Altshuler, L., & Cortes, T. (2015). Journal of General Internal Medicine (30(1), S88).

Implementing interprofessional, graduate level geriatric primary care education: Reflections on year 1 of a new program.

Squires, A., Adams, J., Greenberg, S. A., Oh, S.Y., Altshuler, L., & Cortes, T. (2015). Journal of General Internal Medicine (30(1), S185-S186).

Analysis of measurement tools of fear of falling for high-risk, community-dwelling older adults.

Greenberg, S. A. (2012). Clinical nursing research 21, (113-30). 10.1177/1054773811433824
Abstract

Fear of falling has many health consequences among older adults and may lead to curtailment of activities, immobility, functional dependence, falls, and serious injury. The lack of clarity as to how to best measure fear of falling among high-risk, community-dwelling older adults defined as those who are nursing home eligible, functionally dependent, and vulnerable is further complicated by the multiple definitions used throughout the science. Fear of falling is important to measure effectively if we are to develop and test interventions to promote safe aging in place and prevent injury and institutionalization. This integrative review, 1982 to the present, leads to the conclusion that the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) long form stands out as the most appropriate measurement tool to best assess fear of falling in this unique, understudied, and underserved population.

Immunizations for Older Adults

Greenberg, S. A. (2012). Try This series: Best practice in nursing care to older adults Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, NYU College of Nursing.

The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)

Greenberg, S. A. (2012). Try This series: Best practice in nursing care to older adults Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, NYU College of Nursing

Assessment of fear of falling in older adults: The Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I)

Greenberg, S. A. (2011). Try This series: Best practice in nursing care to older adults Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, NYU College of Nursing

The Evolution and Future of Advanced Practice

Greenberg, S. A. (2010). Nurse Practitioners (5th Ed.) (pp. 379-387). New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Frail Older Patient Care by Interdisciplinary Teams

Dyer, C.B., Hyer, K., Feldt, K.S., Lindemann, D.A., Busby-Whitehead, J., Greenberg, S., … Flaherty, E. (2004). Gerontology & Geriatrics Education 24, (51-62). 10.1300/j021v24n02_05 Informa UK Limited.

Elder Abuse and Neglect

Wagner, L., Greenberg, S. A., & Capezuti, E. (2002). Advanced Practice Nursing with Older Adults: Clinical Guidelines (pp. 319-332). New York: McGraw-Hill..

Gerontologic nurse practitioner preceptor guide

Feldt, K.S., Fay, V., Greenberg, S.A., Vezina, M., Flaherty, E., Ryan, M., & Fulmer, T. (2002). Geriatric Nursing 23, (94-98). 10.1067/mgn.2002.123795 Elsevier BV.

Methodologic Issues in Conducting Research on Hospitalized Older People

Berkman, C.S., Leipzig, R.M., Greenberg, S.A., & Inouye, S.K. (2002). Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 49, (172-178). 10.1046/j.1532-5415.2001.49039.x Wiley-Blackwell.

Naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs)

Greenberg, S. A. (2001). Encyclopedia For Elder Care (pp. 448-450). New York: Springer Publishing Company..

Providing optimal hands-on experience: A guide for clinical preceptors

Fay, V., Feldt, K. S., Greenberg, S. A., Vezina, M., Flaherty, E., Ryan, M., & Fulmer, T. (2001). Advance for Nurse Practitioners (9(3), 71-72).

Digitoxin metabolism by rat liver microsomes.

Schmoldt, A., Benthe, H. F., & Haberland, G. (1975). Biochemical pharmacology 24, (1639-41). 10.1152/ajplegacy.1975.229.3.754
Abstract

Coronary vascular and myocardial responses to selective hypoxic and/or hypercapnic carotid chemoreceptor stimulation were investigated in constantly ventilated, pentobarbital or urethan-chloralose anesthetized dogs. Bilaterally isolated carotid chemoreceptors were perfused with autologous blood of varying O2 and CO2 tensions via an extracorporeal lung circuit. Systemic gas tensions were unchanged. Effects of carotid chemoreceptor stimulation on coronary vascular resistance, left ventricular dP/dt, and strain-gauge arch output were studied at natural coronary blood flow with the chest closed and during constant-flow perfusion of the left common coronary artery with the chest open. Carotid chemoreceptor stimulation slightly increased left ventricular dP/dt and slightly decreased the strain-gauge arch output, while markedly increasing systemic pressure. Coronary blood flow increased; however, coronary vascular resistance wa.as not affected. These studies show that local carotid body stimulation increases coronary blood flow but has little effect on the myocardium. The increase in coronary blood flow results mainly from an increase in systemic arterial pressure. Thus these data provide little evidence for increased sympathetic activity of the heart during local stimulation of the carotid chemoreceptors with hypoxic and hypercapnic blood.

Identifying distinct risk profiles to predict adverse events among community-dwelling older adults.

O'Connor, M., Hanlon, A., Mauer, E., Meghani, S., Masterson-Creber, R., Marcantonio, S., … Naylor, M. Geriatric nursing (New York, N.Y.) 38, (510-519). 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2017.03.013
Abstract

Preventing adverse events among chronically ill older adults living in the community is a national health priority. The purpose of this study was to generate distinct risk profiles and compare these profiles in time to: hospitalization, emergency department (ED) visit or death in 371 community-dwelling older adults enrolled in a Medicare demonstration project. Guided by the Behavioral Model of Health Service Use, a secondary analysis was conducted using Latent Class Analysis to generate the risk profiles with Kaplan Meier methodology and log rank statistics to compare risk profiles. The Vuong-Lo-Mendell-Rubin Likelihood Ratio Test demonstrated optimal fit for three risk profiles (High, Medium, and Low Risk). The High Risk profile had significantly shorter time to hospitalization, ED visit, and death (p < 0.001 for each). These findings provide a road map for generating risk profiles that could enable more effective targeting of interventions and be instrumental in reducing health care costs for subgroups of chronically ill community-dwelling older adults.

Measuring fear of falling among high-risk, urban, community-dwelling older adults.

Greenberg, S. A., Sullivan-Marx, E., Sommers, M. L., Chittams, J., & Cacchione, P. Z. Geriatric nursing (New York, N.Y.) 37, (489-495). 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2016.08.018
Abstract

Fear of falling (FOF) creates a psychological barrier to performing activities for many older adults. The negative impact of fear of falling increases risk of curtailment of activities, future falls, and injury. The specific aim for this study was to investigate the relationship between two fear of falling measures used in clinical research, the FOF Likert scale and Falls Self Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). The study included a convenience sample of 107 high-risk, community-dwelling, mostly Black (94%) members from one Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly program. The FOF scale is one-item asking to rate overall concern about falling, while the FES-I is 16-items rating concern about falling during physical and social activities. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis were highly significant (F-value = 22.25, R-squared = 0.39, p < 0.0001). The Graded Response Model statistics demonstrated one underlying latent factor, fear of falling. This study supports the use of both tools for thorough FOF measurement.

Media