Faculty

Amy Stimpfel headshot

Amy Stimpfel

Assistant Professor

1 212 992 9387

433 First Avenue
Room 658
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Amy Witkoski Stimpfel, PhD, RN joinedthe Rory Meyers College of Nursing as an assistant professor in 2013, following a T-32 post-doctoral fellowship in the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Witkoski Stimpfel's research is focused on identifying modifiable conditions in nurses’ work environment that influence nurse well-being, such as occupational injuries and burnout, and clinical outcomes, such as quality of care and patient satisfaction. Her scholarship uses theories and methodologies from health services research, occupational health and safety, sleep/chronobiology, and nursing. Dr. Witkoski Stimpfel is currently the Co-Program Director of the NIOSH-funded doctoral training program in Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing.

Education

University of Pennsylvania, 2011, PhD
University of Pennsylvania, 2009, MS
Villanova University, 2006, BSN

Honors and awards

At-large member, Advisory Committee of the Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues (IRGNI) (2017)
T32 Post-doctoral fellowship, National Institute of Nursing Research (2011)
T01 Pre-doctoral fellowship, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (2009)
Cum laude graduate, Villanova University (2006)
Inducted into Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society (2005)
Connelly-Delouvrier Scholarship for International Nursing in Ireland (2005)

Specialties

Nursing workforce

Professional membership

AcademyHealth
American Nurses Association
American Organization of Nurse Executives
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Sigma Theta Tau International
Sleep Research Society

Publications

Publications

Faculty and Student Perspectives on Mentorship in a Nursing Honors Program

Nelson, N., Lim, F., Margaret-Navarra, A., Rodriguez, K., Witkoski, A., & Slater, L. Z. (2018). Nursing Education Perspectives, 39(1), 29-31. 10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000197
Abstract
Honors programs in nursing can facilitate the professional development of high-achieving students, supporting their lifelong engagement in nursing practice, education, research, and health care policy issues. Strong mentoring relationships are commonly identified as essential to the success of nursing honors programs, but literature on mentoring relationships in an honors context is limited. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into faculty and student expectations for mentorship. Faculty and students shared similar expectations for both the mentor and mentee, highlighting key themes of engagement, facilitation, accountability, and collaboration as necessary for the success of an undergraduate nursing honors program.

The meaning of “capacity building” for the nurse workforce in sub-Saharan Africa: An integrative review

Ridge, L. J., Klar, R., Stimpfel, A., & Squires, A. (2018). International Journal of Nursing Studies, 86, 151-161. 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.04.019
Abstract
Background: “Capacity building” is an international development strategy which receives billions of dollars of investment annually and is utilized by major development agencies globally. However, there is a lack of consensus around what “capacity building” or even “capacity” itself, means. Nurses are the frequent target of capacity building programming in sub-Saharan Africa as they provide the majority of healthcare in that region. Objectives: This study explored how “capacity” was conceptualized and operationalized by capacity building practitioners working in sub-Saharan Africa to develop its nursing workforce, and to assess Hilderband and Grindle's (1996) “Dimensions of Capacity” model was for fit with “capacity's” definition in the field. Design: An integrative review of the literature using systematic search criteria. Data sources searched included: PubMed, the Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, the Excerpt Medica Database, and Web of Science. Review methods: This review utilized conventional content analysis to assess how capacity building practitioners working in sub-Saharan Africa utilize the term “capacity” in the nursing context. Content analysis was conducted separately for how capacity building practitioners described “capacity” versus how their programs operationalized it. Identified themes were then assessed for fit with Hilderband and Grindle's (1996) “Dimensions of Capacity” model. Results: Analysis showed primary themes for conceptualization of capacity building of nurses by practitioners included: human resources for health, particularly pre- and post- nursing licensure training, and human (nursing) resource retention. Other themes included: management, health expenditure, and physical resources. There are several commonly used metrics for human resources for health, and a few for health expenditures, but none for management or physical resources. Overlapping themes of operationalization include: number of healthcare workers, post-licensure training, and physical resources. The Hilderband and Grindle (1996) model was a strong fit with how capacity is defined by practitioners working on nursing workforce issues in sub-Saharan Africa. If overall significant differences between conceptualization and operationalization emerged, as the reader I want to know what these differences were. Conclusions: This review indicates there is significant informal consensus on the definition of “capacity” and that the Hilderbrand and Grindle (1996) framework is a good representation of that consensus. This framework could be utilized by capacity building practitioners and researchers as those groups plan, execute, and evaluate nursing capacity building programming.

Beliefs and perceptions of mentorship among nursing faculty and traditional and accelerated undergraduate nursing students

-Dunn-Navarra, A.-M., Stimpfel, A., Rodriguez, K., Lim, F., Nelson, N., & Slater, L. (2017). Nurse Education Today, 61, 20-24. 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.009
Abstract
Background In order to meet the demands of a dynamic and complex health care landscape, nursing education must develop and implement programming to produce a highly educated nursing workforce. Interprofessional honors education in nursing with targeted mentorship is one such model. Purpose To describe undergraduate nursing student and faculty perceptions and beliefs of mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education, and compare and contrast the perceptions and beliefs about mentorship in interprofessional honors education between undergraduate nursing students and faculty. Methods The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive design. Data were collected at an urban university in the northeast US, using a researcher-developed electronic survey. The sample included 24 full-time nursing faculty, and 142 undergraduate nursing students. Results Perceptions and beliefs regarding mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education were similar for faculty and students, with both ranking mentorship among the most important components of a successful honors program. Conclusions Honors education with a dedicated mentorship component may be implemented to improve the undergraduate education experience, facilitate advanced degree attainment, and develop future nursing leaders.

Honors Programs: Current Perspectives for Implementation

Lim, F., Nelson, N., Stimpfel, A. W., Margaret-Navarra, A., & Slater, L. Z. (2015). Nurse Educator. 10.1097/NNE.0000000000000211
Abstract
The changing demographics of the nursing workforce, including large numbers of impending retirements, highlight the need for innovative programs to attract the next generation of nursing leaders, educators, and researchers. Nursing honors programs provide an enhanced educational experience for high-achieving and highly motivated students, developing them as future nursing leaders. This review describes the current perspectives, characteristics, and values of nursing honors programs, opportunities for implementation, and recommendations for integration within nursing education.