Publications

Publications

Termination and Outcome Evaluation

Conklin, D., & Wheeler, K. (2022). In Psychotherapy for the Advanced Practice Nurse.

Achieving Global Targets to Reduce Hypertension: The Importance of Hypertension Self-care Measurement

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Adaptation and Piloting for Hospice Social Workers of Aliviado Dementia Care, a Dementia Symptom Management Program

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Advance Care Planning Engagement and End-of-life Preference Among Older Chinese Americans: Do Family Relationships and Immigrant Status Matter?

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Advance Care Planning, Palliative Care, and End-of-life Care Interventions for Racial and Ethnic Underrepresented Groups: A Systematic Review

Jones, T., Luth, E. A., Lin, S. Y., & Brody, A. A. (2021). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 62(3), e248-e260. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.04.025
Abstract
Abstract
Context: Persons from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups experience disparities in access to and quality of palliative and end-of-life care. Objectives: To summarize and evaluate existing palliative and end-of-life care interventions that aim to improve outcomes for racial and ethnic underrepresented populations in the United States. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature in the English language from four databases through January 2020. Peer-reviewed studies that implemented interventions on palliative care, advance care planning, or end-of-life care were considered eligible. Data were extracted from 16 articles using pre-specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Quality was appraised using the modified Downs and Black tool for assessing risk of bias in quantitative studies. Results: Five studies were randomized controlled trials, and the remainder were quasi-experiments. Six studies targeted Latino/Hispanic Americans, five African Americans, and five, Asian or Pacific Islander Americans. The two randomized control trials reviewed and rated “very high” quality, found educational interventions to have significant positive effects on advance care planning and advance directive completion and engagement for underrepresented racial or ethnic groups. Conclusion: The effectiveness of advance care planning, end-of-life, and palliative care interventions in improving outcomes for underrepresented racial and ethnic populations remains uncertain. Randomized controlled trials and educational interventions indicate that interventions targeting underrepresented groups can have significant and positive effects on advance directives and/or advance care planning-related outcomes. More high-quality intervention studies that address racial and ethnic health disparities in palliative care are needed, particularly those that address systemic racism and other complex multilevel factors that influence disparities in health.

Advance Directive Completion and Its Associated Factors Among Older Chinese Americans

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Age at Migration and Cognitive Health Among Chinese Older Immigrants in the United States

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The Aging Physician

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Aliviado Mobile App for Hospice Providers: A Usability Study

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Antimicrobial Stewardship Interventions to Optimize Treatment of Infections in Nursing Home Residents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Anxiety profiles are associated with stress, resilience and symptom severity in outpatients receiving chemotherapy

Oppegaard, K., Harris, C. S., Shin, J., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B. A., Levine, J. D., Conley, Y. P., Hammer, M., Cartwright, F., Wright, F., Dunn, L., Kober, K. M., & Miaskowski, C. (2021). Supportive Care in Cancer. 10.1007/s00520-021-06372-w
Abstract
Abstract
Purpose: The purposes of this study, in a sample of oncology patients (n = 1326) receiving chemotherapy, were to identify subgroups of patients with distinct anxiety profiles and evaluate for differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, stress and resilience measures, and severity of co-occurring symptoms (i.e., depression, sleep disturbance, attentional function, fatigue, pain). Methods: Patients completed self-report questionnaires a total of six times over two cycles of chemotherapy. Severity of state anxiety was evaluated using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory and resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, Lee Fatigue Scale, Attentional Function Index and Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Based on the findings from the latent profile analysis that utilized the six assessments of state anxiety, 47.7% of the patients were classified as “Low,” 28.3% as “Moderate,” 19.5% as “High,” and 4.5.% as “Very High.” Anxiety levels remained relatively stable across the six timepoints. Compared to the Low class, membership in the Moderate, High, and Very High classes was associated with a number of characteristics (e.g., younger age, female gender, lower functional status, more comorbidities). Those patients with higher levels of anxiety reported higher levels of stress, lower levels of resilience, and increased severity of co-occurring symptoms. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a substantial number of oncology patients may warrant referral to psychological services. Clinicians need to perform systematic assessments of anxiety, stress, and common symptoms and initiate appropriate interventions to enhance resilience and coping.

Applying a Nursing Perspective to Address the Challenges Experienced by Cisgender Women in the HIV Status Neutral Care Continuum: A Review of the Literature

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Applying Psychiatry and Psychology Principles to Lifestyle Approaches for Mental and Behavioral Health

Merlo, G., & Vela, A. (2021). American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 10.1177/15598276211023415
Abstract
Abstract
Research suggests that mental health symptoms and disorders are historically underdiagnosed and undertreated, in part due to the siloed nature of medicine. Yet, approximately 50 million American adults experience a mental health disorder. As the field of lifestyle medicine continues to emerge and grow, there is an important opportunity to address mental health from a lifestyle medicine perspective, as well as to ensure that lifestyle medicine can be utilized for all patients, including those with mental health conditions. To effectively address mental health, the field of lifestyle medicine would benefit from understanding and leveraging the decades of science and practice from the fields of psychiatry and psychology, as well as the expertise of psychiatrists and psychologists who are familiar with the science and trained in lifestyle medicine. Incorporating empirical literature from other areas, utilizing well-established conceptual frameworks, and addressing the overlap between lifestyle medicine and mental health early in, and throughout, training and education, are important steps to move toward addressing mental and behavioral health with a lifestyle medicine approach.

Applying Real-World Data to Inform Continuous Glucose Monitoring Use in Clinical Practice

Zheng, Y., Siminerio, L. M., Krall, J., Anton, B. B., Hodges, J. C., Bednarz, L., Li, D., & Ng, J. M. (2021). Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 1932296821997403. 10.1177/1932296821997403

Art Attendance and Change in Cognitive Function Among U.S. Community-Dwelling Chinese Older Adults

Petrovsky, D. V., Wu, B., Hodgson, N. A., & Dong, X. Q. (2021). Journal of Applied Gerontology. 10.1177/07334648211017339
Abstract
Abstract
Engaging in leisure activities that are cognitively simulating and enjoyable may be protective against cognitive decline in older adults; yet, few studies have examined this topic. We used two waves of data from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly and ran mixed-effects regression models to examine the relationship between baseline art activity attendance (including attending museum, musical arts, or both) and change in cognitive function (global, episodic memory, working memory, and executive function) among 2,703 older U.S. Chinese adults. We found that compared with older adults who did not attend any art activities, those who reported attending both art activities experienced a slower rate of change in episodic memory (estimate = −0.07; SE = 0.03; p =.01) and executive function (estimate = −0.06; SE =.03; p =.04). Our study findings point to the importance of attending art-based culture events among U.S. Chinese older adults.

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

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Assessing psychological symptom networks related to HIV-positive duration among people living with HIV: a network analysis

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Assessment of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Infection and Mortality Rates Among Nursing Homes With Different Proportions of Black Residents

Travers, J. L., Agarwal, M., Estrada, L. V., Dick, A. W., Gracner, T., Wu, B., & Stone, P. W. (2021). Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 22(4), 893-898.e2. 10.1016/j.jamda.2021.02.014
Abstract
Abstract
Objective: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately impacted nursing homes (NHs) with large shares of Black residents. We examined the associations between the proportion of Black residents in NHs and COVID-19 infections and deaths, accounting for structural bias (operationalized as county-level factors) and stratifying by urbanicity/rurality. Design: This was a cross-sectional observational cohort study using publicly available data from the LTCfocus, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Long-Term Care Facility COVID-19 Module, and the NYTimes county-level COVID-19 database. Four multivariable linear regression models omitting and including facility characteristics, COVID-19 burden, and county-level fixed effects were estimated. Setting and Participants: In total, 11,587 US NHs that reported data on COVID-19 to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and had data in LTCfocus and NYTimes from January 20, 2020 through July 19, 2020. Measures: Proportion of Black residents in NHs (exposure); COVID-19 infections and deaths (main outcomes). Results: The proportion of Black residents in NHs were as follows: none= 3639 (31.4%), <20% = 1020 (8.8%), 20%-49.9% = 1586 (13.7%), ≥50% = 681 (5.9%), not reported = 4661 (40.2%). NHs with any Black residents showed significantly more COVID-19 infections and deaths than NHs with no Black residents. There were 13.6 percentage points more infections and 3.5 percentage points more deaths in NHs with ≥50% Black residents than in NHs with no Black residents (P <.001). Although facility characteristics explained some of the differences found in multivariable analyses, county-level factors and rurality explained more of the differences. Conclusions and Implications: It is likely that attributes of place, such as resources, services, and providers, important to equitable care and health outcomes are not readily available to counties where NHs have greater proportions of Black residents. Structural bias may underlie these inequities. It is imperative that support be provided to NHs that serve greater proportions of Black residents while considering the rurality of the NH setting.

Assessment of post-operative opioid prescribing practices in a community hospital ambulatory surgical center

Bromberg, W. D., Emanuel, T., Zeller, V., Galloway, E., Mogan, S., Diamond, J., Statler, D., & Wright, F. (2021). Journal of Opioid Management, 17(3), 241-249. 10.5055/JOM.2021.0634
Abstract
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the prescribing practices and opioid consumption in an ambulatory setting to inform the development of evidence-based guidelines. Design: A prospective study of adults undergoing outpatient open and laparoscopic surgeries over 3 months. One week after discharge, a telephonic interview quantified the number of opioids prescribed and consumed, degree of pain control and satisfaction, and whether additional pain medication was requested. Setting: Community hospital ambulatory surgery center in Westchester County, New York. Participants: This study included 304 adults undergoing a variety of procedures by surgeons from multiple specialties. Main outcome measures: Quantify surgeons’ postoperative opioid prescribing compared with patient opioid consumption. Results: Eighty-one percent (N = 245) responded to the survey, of which 64 percent were prescribed opioids. Males and females were equally represented with the mean age of 59.4 years. Of those prescribed opioids, 92 percent filled the prescription. The most commonly prescribed opioids reported by the patients that filled their prescription (N = 145) were oxycodone (36.5 percent), oxycodone/acetaminophen (28.9 percent), and tramadol (22.7 percent). The mean number of opioid pills prescribed was 20 and the mean consumption was 6.7 pills, resulting in an average of 13 retained pills. Only 3.8 percent of the patients prescribed opioids at discharge called their provider for additional analgesia. Despite the low opioid consumption patients reported high satisfaction (4.5 on scale of 0-5) with pain control. Only 10.4 percent reported that the surgeon recommended an over the counter (OTC) analgesic option. There was variability in the amount of opioids prescribed within each surgical category. Conclusions: One week after outpatient surgery, patients consumed one-third of physician-prescribed opioids, yet they reported high pain management satisfaction. Our study will inform the development of a patient-centered interdisciplinary perioperative education program to more effectively tailor multimodal pain management in ambulatory surgical patients and collaterally reduce the number of retained opioids.

Association between primary caregiver type and mortality among Chinese older adults with disability: a prospective cohort study

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Associations of Insomnia Symptoms With Cognition in Persons With Heart Failure

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At-Risk populations and public health emergency preparedness in the United States: Nursing leadership in communities

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Attaining interprofessional competencies by connecting oral health to overall health

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Back pain and heart failure in community-dwelling older adults: Findings from the Health ABC study

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Best Interest Standard in School Health: A Concept Analysis

Grunin, L., & Malone, S. (2021). Journal of School Nursing. 10.1177/10598405211001459
Abstract
Abstract
The bioethical concept of best interest standard is cited in courts across America and considered to be an effective method of managing pediatric health care decision-making. Although the best interest standard is referred to in an abundance of nursing, medical, legal, and bioethical literature, refinement and a clear definition of the concept are lacking in the context of school health. An exhaustive and methodical search was conducted across six databases revealing 41 articles from the past decade. The Wilsonian methodology was used to analyze, refine, and clarify the concept of best interest standard by presenting original case vignettes (model, contrary, related, and borderline) and an innovative conceptual model as it applies to school nursing. This concept analysis provides school nurses with a deeper understanding of the best interest standard to navigate the complex nature of making school health care decisions.