Publications

Publications

Addressing a Critical Gap in U.S. National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Father-Based Sexual and Reproductive Health Interventions for Latino Adolescent Males

Guilamo, V., Bowman, A. S., Santa Maria, D., Kabemba, F., & Geronimo, Y. (2018). Journal of Adolescent Health, 62(3), S72-S80. 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.08.015
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of the research was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a father-based sexual and reproductive health intervention designed to reduce sexual and reproductive (SRH) disparities and increase correct and consistent condom use among Latino adolescent males. Methods: The current study conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with Latino father-son dyads (N=30) designed to elicit perspectives on communication regarding sex and condom use. In addition, the interview protocol included father-son preferences regarding paternal involvement in condom instruction and perceived obstacles and advantages of father direct involvement in education efforts designed to increase correct and consistent condom use among their adolescent sons. Three independent coders conducted both vertical and horizontal analyses of the data to identify emergent themes and reach theoretical saturation. Results: The main findings from this study suggest that Latino fathers can be impactful in shaping Latino adolescent male sexual decision-making and correct and consistent condom use. However, our data highlight that while both feasible and acceptable, Latino fathers identify needing additional support in how best to communicate and seek opportunities to master their own knowledge and skills regarding condom use and effective communication with their adolescent sons about sex. Conclusions: Latino father-based interventions represent an acceptable and feasible option for building upon the recent success of U.S. national efforts to reduce teen pregnancy rates and STI disparities among Latino youth. However, there exists a need for father-based programs that will support Latino fathers in best educating their sons about condom use and better addressing their SRH. Ongoing national efforts to reduce Latino teen SRH disparities warrant the consideration of father-son interventions for Latino adolescent males in the United States.

Addressing the Social Determinants of Health: A Call to Action for School Nurses

Schroeder, K., Malone, S., McCabe, E., & Lipman, T. (2018). Journal of School Nursing, 34(3), 182-191. 10.1177/1059840517750733
Abstract
Social determinants of health (SDOH), the conditions in which children are born, grow, live, work or attend school, and age, impact child health and contribute to health disparities. School nurses must consider these factors as part of their clinical practice because they significantly and directly influence child well-being. We provide clinical guidance for addressing the SDOH when caring for children with three common health problems (obesity, insufficient sleep, and asthma). Given their unique role as school-based clinical experts, care coordinators, and student advocates, school nurses are well suited to serve as leaders in addressing SDOH.

An assistive technology system that provides personalized dressing support for people living with dementia: Capability study

Burleson, W., Lozano, C., Ravishankar, V., Lee, J., & Mahoney, D. (2018). Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(5). 10.2196/medinform.5587
Abstract
Background: Individuals living with advancing stages of dementia (persons with dementia, PWDs) or other cognitive disorders do not have the luxury of remembering how to perform basic day-to-day activities, which in turn makes them increasingly dependent on the assistance of caregivers. Dressing is one of the most common and stressful activities provided by caregivers because of its complexity and privacy challenges posed during the process. Objective: In preparation for in-home trials with PWDs, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a prototype intelligent system, the DRESS prototype, to assess its ability to provide automated assistance with dressing that can afford independence and privacy to individual PWDs and potentially provide additional freedom to their caregivers (family members and professionals). Methods: This laboratory study evaluated the DRESS prototype's capacity to detect dressing events. These events were engaged in by 11 healthy participants simulating common correct and incorrect dressing scenarios. The events ranged from donning a shirt and pants inside out or backwards to partial dressing-typical issues that challenge a PWD and their caregivers. Results: A set of expected detections for correct dressing was prepared via video analysis of all participants' dressing behaviors. In the initial phases of donning either shirts or pants, the DRESS prototype missed only 4 out of 388 expected detections. The prototype's ability to recognize other missing detections varied across conditions. There were also some unexpected detections such as detection of the inside of a shirt as it was being put on. Throughout the study, detection of dressing events was adversely affected by the relatively smaller effective size of the markers at greater distances. Although the DRESS prototype incorrectly identified 10 of 22 cases for shirts, the prototype preformed significantly better for pants, incorrectly identifying only 5 of 22 cases. Further analyses identified opportunities to improve the DRESS prototype's reliability, including increasing the size of markers, minimizing garment folding or occlusions, and optimal positioning of participants with respect to the DRESS prototype. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the ability to detect clothing orientation and position and infer current state of dressing using a combination of sensors, intelligent software, and barcode tracking. With improvements identified by this study, the DRESS prototype has the potential to provide a viable option to provide automated dressing support to assist PWDs in maintaining their independence and privacy, while potentially providing their caregivers with the much-needed respite.

Cardiovascular disease risk among older immigrants in the United States

Sadarangani, T., Chyun, D., Trinh-Shevrin, C., Yu, G., & Kovner, C. (2018). Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 33(6), 544-550. 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000498
Abstract
Background: In the United States, 16 million immigrants are 50 years and older, but little is known about their cardiometabolic health and how to best assess their cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Aging immigrants may therefore not be benefitting from advances in CVD prevention. Objective: In this study, we estimate and compare CVD risk in a nationally representative sample of aging immigrants using 3 different measures. Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Immigrants 50 years and older with no history of CVD were eligible. The Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Pooled Cohort Risk Equation, and presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) were used to estimate risk. Bivariate statistics were analyzed using SPSS version 23.0 Complex Survey module to account for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey unique weighting scheme. Results: The mean age of the sample was 61.3 years; 40% had hypertension, 17% had diabetes, 10% were smokers, and 95% did not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines. Proportions at an elevated CVD risk were as follows: American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, 42% female and 76% male; FRS, 17.4% female and 76% male; and MetS, 22% female and 24% male. Conclusions: Immigrants had a lower overall risk using MetS and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association equation than has been found using these tools in similarly aged samples. The opposite was true for the FRS. The discrepancy between the proportion at risk and those being treated may reflect healthcare access gaps that warrant further investigation. A more holistic approach to risk measurement is needed that accounts for determinants of health that disproportionately affect immigrants, including language and socioeconomic status.

Changes in the Occurrence, Severity, and Distress of Symptoms in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancers Receiving Chemotherapy

Tantoy, I. Y., Cooper, B. A., Dhruva, A., Cataldo, J., Paul, S. M., Conley, Y. P., Hammer, M., Wright, F., Dunn, L. B., Levine, J. D., & Miaskowski, C. (2018). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.10.004
Abstract
Context: Studies on multiple dimensions of the symptom experience of patients with gastrointestinal cancers are extremely limited. Objective: Purpose was to evaluate for changes over time in the occurrence, severity, and distress of seven common symptoms in these patients. Methods: Patients completed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, six times over two cycles of chemotherapy (CTX). Changes over time in occurrence, severity, and distress of pain, lack of energy, nausea, feeling drowsy, difficulty sleeping, and change in the way food tastes were evaluated using multilevel regression analyses. In the conditional models, effects of treatment group (i.e., with or without targeted therapy), age, number of metastatic sites, time from cancer diagnosis, number of prior cancer treatments, cancer diagnosis, and CTX regimen on enrollment levels, as well as the trajectories of symptom occurrence, severity, and distress were evaluated. Results: Although the occurrence rates for pain, lack of energy, feeling drowsy, difficulty sleeping, and change in the way food tastes declined over the two cycles of CTX, nausea and numbness/tingling in hands/feet had more complex patterns of occurrence. Severity and distress ratings for the seven symptoms varied across the two cycles of CTX. Conclusions: Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with differences in enrollment levels as well as changes over time in occurrence, severity, and distress of these seven common symptoms were highly variable. These findings can be used to identify patients who are at higher risk for more severe and distressing symptoms during CTX and to enable the initiation of preemptive symptom management interventions.

Collecting Mobility Data with GPS Methods to Understand the HIV Environmental Riskscape Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Multi-city Feasibility Study in the Deep South

Duncan, D., Chaix, B., Regan, S. D., Park, S. H., Draper, C., Goedel, W. C., Gipson, J. A., Guilamo, V., Halkitis, P. N., Brewer, R., & Hickson, D. M. (2018). AIDS and Behavior, 1-14. 10.1007/s10461-018-2163-9
Abstract
While research increasingly studies how neighborhood contexts influence HIV among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) populations, to date, no research has used global positioning system (GPS) devices, an innovative method to study spatial mobility through neighborhood contexts, i.e., the environmental riskscape, among a sample of Black MSM. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of collecting two-week GPS data (as measured by a pre- and post-surveys as well as objectively measured adherence to GPS protocol) among a geographically-diverse sample of Black MSM in the Deep South: Gulfport, MS, Jackson, MS, and New Orleans LA (n = 75). GPS feasibility was demonstrated including from survey items, e.g. Black MSM reported high ratings of pre-protocol acceptability, ease of use, and low levels of wear-related concerns. Findings from this study demonstrate that using GPS methods is acceptable and feasible among Black MSM in the Deep South.

Continuous professional development of Liberia's midwifery workforce—A coordinated multi-stakeholder approach

Michel-Schuldt, M., Billy Dayon, M., Klar, R., Subah, M., King-Lincoln, E., Kpangbala-Flomo, C., & Broniatowski, R. (2018). Midwifery, 62, 77-80. 10.1016/j.midw.2018.02.023
Abstract
Background: Maternal and newborn mortality remains high in Liberia. There is a severe rural–urban gap in accessibility to health care services. A competent midwifery workforce is able to meet the needs of mothers and newborns. Evidence shows that competence can be assured through initial education along with continuous professional development (CPD). In the past, CPD was not regulated and coordinated in Liberia which is cpommon in the African region. Aim: To Support a competent regulated midwifery workforce through continuous professional development. Methodology: A new CPD model was developed by the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery. With its establishment, all midwives and nurses are required to undertake CPD programmes consisting of certified training and mentoring in order to renew their practicing license. The new model is being piloted in one county in which regular mentoring visits that include skills training are being conducted combined with the use of mobile learning applications addressing maternity health issues. Quality control of the CPD pilot is assured by the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery. The mentoring visits are conducted on a clinical level but are coordinated on the national and county level. Successes and sustainability: CPD using mobile learning on smartphones and regular mentoring visits not only improved knowledge and skills of midwives and nurses but also provided a solution to enhance accessibility in rural areas through improved communication and transportation, as well as improved career development of health personnel working in remote areas. Mentors were trained on a national, county, and health facility level in the pilot county with mentoring visits conducted regularly. Conclusion: The CPD programme of the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery, currently in pilot-testing by various partners, aims to highlight the positive impact of the coordinating role of both the regulatory body and health authorities. Using regular process and programme reviews to improve capacity, knowledge, and skills of health professionals.

Cultural competence and psychological empowerment among acute care nurses

Ea, E., & Gilles, S. (2018). In Nursing research critique: A model for excellence. Springer.

Delivering LGBTQ-sensitive care

Lim, F., Paguirigan, M., & Cernivani, D. (2018). Nursing Critical Care, 13(4), 14-19. 10.1097/01.CCN.0000534918.70677.9c
Abstract
Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community have historically faced prejudices, often resulting in significant health disparities. Critical care nurses have a duty to provide all patients, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, with the best possible care. This article examines a framework for LGBTQ-sensitive care as well as best practices and additional resources.

Discussing the nuances of sexual health with patients

Newland, J. (2018). Nurse Practitioner, 43(9). 10.1097/01.NPR.0000544283.12633.b0

Dose-Dependent Associations between Sleep Duration and Unsafe Behaviors among US High School Students

Weaver, M. D., Barger, L. K., Malone, S., Anderson, L. S., & Klerman, E. B. (2018). JAMA Pediatrics. 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.2777

An educational intervention to evaluate nurses’ knowledge of heart failure

Sundel, S., & Ea, E. (2018). Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 49(7), 315-321. 10.3928/00220124-20180613-07
Abstract
Background: Nurses are the main providers of patient education in inpatient and outpatient settings. Unfortunately, nurses may lack knowledge of chronic medical conditions, such as heart failure. Method: The purpose of this one-group pretest– posttest intervention was to determine the effectiveness of teaching intervention on nurses’ knowledge of heart failure self-care principles in an ambulatory care setting. The sample consisted of 40 staff nurses in ambulatory care. Nurse participants received a focused education intervention based on knowledge deficits revealed in the pretest and were then resurveyed within 30 days. Nurses were evaluated using the valid and reliable 20-item Nurses Knowledge of Heart Failure Education Principles Survey tool. Results: The results of this project demonstrated that an education intervention on heart failure self-care principles improved nurses’ knowledge of heart failure in an ambulatory care setting, which was statistically significant (p, .05). Conclusion: Results suggest that a teaching intervention could improve knowledge of heart failure, which could lead to better patient education and could reduce patient readmission for heart failure.

Faculty and Student Perspectives on Mentorship in a Nursing Honors Program

Nelson, N., Lim, F., Margaret-Navarra, A., Rodriguez, K., Witkoski, A., & Slater, L. Z. (2018). Nursing Education Perspectives, 39(1), 29-31. 10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000197
Abstract
Honors programs in nursing can facilitate the professional development of high-achieving students, supporting their lifelong engagement in nursing practice, education, research, and health care policy issues. Strong mentoring relationships are commonly identified as essential to the success of nursing honors programs, but literature on mentoring relationships in an honors context is limited. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into faculty and student expectations for mentorship. Faculty and students shared similar expectations for both the mentor and mentee, highlighting key themes of engagement, facilitation, accountability, and collaboration as necessary for the success of an undergraduate nursing honors program.

Feasibility and Efficacy of a Student Nurse Delivered, Parent-Based Sexual Health Curriculum in Underserved Communities: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

Santa Maria, D., Reagan, E., Markham, C., Guilamo, V., & Cron, S. (2018). Pediatric Nursing.

Frailty in Older Adults: Assessment, Support, and Treatment Implications in Patients With Cancer

Overcash, J., Cope, D. G., & Van Cleave, J. (2018). Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 22(6), 8-18. 10.1188/18.CJON.S2.8-18
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Frailty is defined as a disability in those of advanced age, often with comorbidities, poor nutritional status, cognitive decline, and reduced functional status. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article is to discuss the concept of frailty, assess the use of a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), and understand the implications for treatment to maintain or enhance physical, functional, and cognitive health of older adult patients with cancer. METHODS: Literature about frailty in older adult patients diagnosed with cancer was reviewed to determine evidence-based assessment and treatment options. FINDINGS: About half of all older adult patients with cancer experience some degree of frailty. CGA is a useful way to evaluate frailty and the extent of limitations. Many frailty-specific tools have been developed. Evidence-based strategies are available to address limitations associated with frailty in older adult patients with cancer.

A Framework for Integrating Oncology Palliative Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Education

Fennimore, L., Wholihan, D., Breakwell, S., Malloy, P., Virani, R., & Ferrell, B. (2018). Journal of Professional Nursing. 10.1016/j.profnurs.2018.09.003
Abstract
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) faculty play a critical role in preparing students to meet the complex needs of the nation as the number of cancer rates and survivors rise (National Cancer Institute, 2018) and as an unprecedented number of older Americans enter into the healthcare system with complicated comorbidities (Whitehead, 2016). Palliative care has dramatically expanded over the past decade and has been increasingly accepted as a standard of care for people with cancer and other serious, chronic, or life-limiting illnesses. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are recognized as important providers of palliative care (Walling et al., 2017). A 2-day course was held with support from the National Cancer Institute to enhance integration of palliative oncology care into DNP curriculum. The course participants (N = 183), consisting of DNP faculty or deans, practicing DNP clinicians, and students, received detailed annotated slides, case studies, and suggested activities to increase student engagement with the learning process. Course content was developed and delivered by palliative care experts and DNP faculty skilled in curriculum design. Participants were required to develop goals on how to enhance their school's DNP curriculum with the course content. They provided updates regarding their progress at integrating the content into their school's curriculum at 6, 12, and 18 months post course. Results demonstrated an increase in incorporating oncology palliative care in DNP scholarly projects and clinical opportunities. Challenges to inclusion of this content in DNP curricula included lack of: perceived time in curriculum; faculty educated in palliative care; and available clinical sites.

Gender differences in the association between migration and cognitive function among older adults in China and India

Xu, H., Vorderstrasse, A., Dupre, M. E., McConnell, E. S., Østbye, T., & Wu, B. (2018). Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 81, 31-38. doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2018.11.011

Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training 2.0: A collaborative team-based approach to delivering care

Giuliante, M. M., Greenberg, S. A., McDonald, M. V., Squires, A., Moore, R., & Cortes, T. A. (2018). Journal of Interprofessional Care, 1-5. 10.1080/13561820.2018.1457630
Abstract
Interprofessional collaborative education and practice has become a cornerstone of optimal person-centered management in the current complex health care climate. This is especially important when working with older adults, many with multiple chronic conditions and challenging health care needs. This paper describes a feasibility study of the Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training 2.0 (GITT 2.0) program focused on providing interprofessional care to complex and frail older adults with multiple chronic conditions. A concurrent triangulation mixed-methods design facilitated program implementation and evaluation. Over three years (2013-2016), 65 graduate students from nursing, midwifery, social work, and pharmacy participated along with 25 preceptors. Participants were surveyed on their attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration pre and post-intervention and participated in focus groups. While attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration did not change quantitatively, focus groups revealed changes in language and enhanced perspectives of participants. Based on the evaluation data, the GITT 2.0 Toolkit was refined for use in interprofessional education and practice activities related to quality initiatives.

Hakuna matata: Our experiences as invited international nurse practitioner consultants in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Herrmann, L., & Brennan, M. (2018). Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 30(10), 546-547. 10.1097/JXX.0000000000000102

Heavy Alcohol Use Among Migrant and Non-Migrant Male Sex Workers in Thailand: A Neglected HIV/STI Vulnerability

Guadamuz, T. E., Clatts, M. C., & Goldsamt, L. (2018). Substance Use and Misuse, 1-8. 10.1080/10826084.2018.1436564
Abstract
Background: There is scarce research on male sex workers in the context of alcohol use. While heavy alcohol use has been established as a risk factor for HIV and STI infections among men who have sex with men (MSM), men who engage in sex work with other men, particularly from the Global South, have not been included in these studies. Moreover, studies among male sex workers in Asia often do not explore migration contexts of these men. Objectives: The objective of this exploratory study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of heavy alcohol use among migrant and non-migrant male sex workers in Bangkok and Pattaya, Central Thailand. Methods: Between August and October 2015, 18–24 year-old migrant and non-migrant male sex workers (n = 212) were recruited from various male sex work-identified venues (bars, clubs, massage parlors, and go-go bars) to take an interviewer-administered cross-sectional survey in Bangkok and Pattaya, Thailand. Measures were adapted from previous studies in similar populations and included structured questions across four domains, including demographic characteristics, alcohol use, stimulant use, and sexual behaviors. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the independent associations between heavy alcohol use (heavy versus not heavy) and demographic characteristics, stimulant use and sexual behavior. Results: Heavy alcohol use was prevalent among one-third of participants. Heavy alcohol use was positively associated with male sex workers who were non-migrant and Thai, currently using stimulants, having 15 or more male clients in the past month and having first consumed alcohol at age 15 years or younger. Conclusions: Current HIV prevention efforts should consider subpopulations of MSM, including male sex workers and migrants, as well as other risk behaviors like alcohol, as important contexts for HIV and STI risks.

HIV Testing and Associated Factors Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Changsha, China

Zhou, J., Chen, J., Goldsamt, L., Wang, H., Zhang, C., & Li, X. (2018). Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. 10.1016/j.jana.2018.05.003
Abstract
Promoting HIV testing is an important strategy to end the HIV epidemic. HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) has increased rapidly in China in recent years, but HIV testing rates are still low. Our cross-sectional study investigated HIV testing rates and analyzed associated factors in 565 MSM in Changsha between April and December 2014. In the previous year, 37.7% of participants had not been tested, 38.2% had had one test, and 24.1% had had two or more tests. Those who initiated sexual debut at an older age, had known someone infected with HIV, or had been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted illness (STI) were more likely to have had an HIV test. HIV intervention programs in China should focus on sexually active young MSM, integrate HIV testing and counseling services in STI clinics, and describe real experiences of living with HIV to improve HIV testing in MSM.

Implementation of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery in a Community Hospital: An Evidence-Based Approach

Persico, M., Miller, D., Way, C., Williamson, M., O’Keefe, K., Strnatko, D., & Wright, F. (2018). Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing. 10.1016/j.jopan.2018.02.005
Abstract
Purpose: Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is an evidence-based practice protocol that has been shown to reduce cost, decrease length of stay (LOS), and improve surgical outcomes. Design: An evidence-based practice improvement project with a multidisciplinary team translated the ERAS protocol into practice at a community hospital. The evidence-based practice improvement design allows integration of evidence into projects to improve clinical outcomes for patients. Methods: Small tests of change using the Plan-Act-Study-Do methodology were used to evaluate the process of implementing one surgical service at a time to ensure effective outcomes. After the process was determined to be effective, patient outcomes (eg, LOS) were measured. Findings: On average, LOS was decreased from 3.2 to 1.7 days. Surgical readmission rate decreased from 3% to 1%. There has been positive feedback and nursing workload has decreased with consistent processes. Conclusions: The ERAS order set continues to be modified based on the evidence and feedback from anesthesia and registered nurses. Monthly reports ensure consistency.

Implementation of Online Opioid Prevention, Recognition and Response Trainings for Laypeople: Year 1 Survey Results

Simmons, J., Rajan, S., Goldsamt, L., & Elliott, L. (2018). Substance Use and Misuse, 1-6. 10.1080/10826084.2018.1451891
Abstract
Background: This article reports on the first implementation of an online opioid-overdose prevention, recognition and response training for laypeople. The training was disseminated nationally in November 2014. Between 2000 and 2014, U.S. opioid deaths increased by 200%. The importance of complementary approaches to reduce opioid overdose deaths, such as online training, cannot be overstated. Objectives: A retrospective evaluation was conducted to assess perceived knowledge, skills to intervene in an overdose, confidence to intervene, and satisfaction with the training. Measurements: Descriptive statistics were used to report sample characteristics, compare experiences with overdose and/or naloxone between subgroups, and describe participants’ satisfaction with the trainings. Z-ratios were used to compare independent proportions, and paired t-tests were used to compare participant responses to items pre- and posttraining, including perceived confidence to intervene and perceived knowledge and skills to intervene successfully. Results: Between January and October 2015, 2,450 laypeople took the online training; 1,464 (59.8%) agreed to be contacted. Of these, 311 (21.2% of those contacted) completed the survey. Over 80% reported high satisfaction with content, format and mode of delivery and high satisfaction with items related to confidence and overdose reversal preparedness. Notably, 89.0% of participants felt they had the knowledge and skills to intervene successfully posttraining compared to 20.3% pretraining (z = −17.2, p <.001). Similarly, posttraining, 87.8% of participants felt confident they could successfully intervene compared to 24.4% pretraining (z = −15.9, p <.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the GetNaloxoneNow.org online training for laypeople.

Improving -Omics-Based Research and Precision Health in Minority Populations: Recommendations for Nurse Scientists

Taylor, J., & Barcelona de Mendoza, V. (2018). Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 50(1), 11-19. 10.1111/jnu.12358
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of nurse scientists in -omics-based research and to promote discussion around the conduct of -omics-based nursing research in minority communities. Nurses are advocates, educators, practitioners, scientists, and researchers, and are crucial to the design and successful implementation of -omics studies, particularly including minority communities. The contribution of nursing in this area of research is crucial to reducing health disparities. Methods: In this article, challenges in the conduct of -omics-based research in minority communities are discussed, and recommendations for improving diversity among nurse scientists, study participants, and utilization of training and continuing education programs in -omics are provided. Findings and Conclusions: Many opportunities exist for nurses to increase their knowledge in -omics and to continue to build the ranks of nurse scientists as leaders in -omics-based research. In order to work successfully with communities of color, nurse scientists must advocate for participation in the Precision Medicine Initiative, improve representation of nurse faculty of color, and increase utilization of training programs in -omics and lead such initiatives. Clinical Relevance: All nursing care has the potential to be affected by the era of -omics and precision health. By taking an inclusive approach to diversity in nursing and -omics research, nurses will be well placed to be leaders in reducing health disparities through research, practice, and education.

Integrating behavioral health care for older adults: Start with nurses

McCabe, D. (2018). Geriatric Nursing. 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2017.12.010