Publications

Publications

Adaptation of the MISSCARE Survey to the Maternity Care Setting

Simpson, K. R., Lyndon, A., Spetz, J., Gay, C. L., & Landstrom, G. L. (2019). JOGNN - Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 48(4), 456-467. 10.1016/j.jogn.2019.05.005
Abstract
Missed nursing care is an important measure of nursing care quality that is sensitive to nurse staffing and is associated with patient outcomes in medical-surgical and pediatric inpatient settings. Missed nursing care during labor and birth has not been studied, yet childbirth represents the most common reason for hospitalization in the United States. The Missed Nursing Care (MISSCARE) Survey, a measure of medical-surgical nursing quality with substantial evidence for validity and reliability, was adapted to maternity nursing care using data from focus groups of labor nurses, physicians, and new mothers and an online survey of labor nurses. Content validity was evaluated via participant feedback, and exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify the factor structure of the instrument. The modified version, the Perinatal Missed Care Survey, appears to be a feasible and promising instrument with which to evaluate missed nursing care of women during labor and birth in hospitals.

Adherence connection for counseling, education, and support: Research protocol for a proof-of-concept study

Dunn-Navarra, A.-M., Gwadz, M., Bakken, S., Whittemore, R., Cleland, C. M., & D’Eramo Melkus, G. (2019). Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(3). 10.2196/12543
Abstract
Background: The highest rates of new HIV infections are observed in African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos (ethnic minority) adolescents and young adults (youth). HIV-infected ethnic minority youth are less likely to initiate and maintain adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) and medical care, as compared with their adult counterparts. Objective: The objective of this research protocol was to describe our proposed methods for testing a peer-led mobile health cognitive behavioral intervention, delivered via remote videoconferencing and smartphones with HIV-infected ethnic minority youth, Adherence Connection for Counseling, Education, and Support (ACCESS). Our secondary aim was to obtain initial estimates of the biobehavioral impact of ACCESS on HIV virologic outcomes and self-reported ART adherence, beliefs and knowledge about ART treatment, adherence self-efficacy, and health care utilization (retention in care). Methods: An exploratory, sequential mixed-methods study design will be used with conceptual determinants of adherence behavior informed by the information-motivation-behavioral skills model. HIV-infected ethnic minority youth aged 16 to 29 years with a detectable HIV serum viral load of more than 200 copies/ml (N=25) will be recruited. Qualitative pretesting will be conducted, including semistructured, in-depth, individual interviews with a convenience sample meeting the study inclusion criteria. Preliminary analysis of qualitative data will be used to inform and tailor the ACCESS intervention. Testing and implementation will include a one-group pre-posttest pilot, delivered by a trained successful peer health coach who lives with HIV and is well-engaged in HIV care and taking ART. A total of 5 peer-led remote videoconferencing sessions will be delivered using study-funded smartphones and targeting adherence information (HIV knowledge), motivation (beliefs and perceptions), and behavioral skills (self-efficacy). Participant satisfaction will be assessed with poststudy focus groups and quantitative survey methodology. Bivariate analyses will be computed to compare pre- and postintervention changes in HIV biomarkers, self-reported ART adherence, beliefs and knowledge about ART, adherence self-efficacy, and retention in care. Results: As of December 2018, we are in the data analysis phase of this pilot and anticipate completion with dissemination of final study findings by spring/summer 2019. The major outcomes will include intervention feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary evidence of impact on serum HIV RNA quantitative viral load (primary adherence outcome variable). Self-reported ART adherence and retention in care will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Findings from the qualitative pretesting will contribute to an improved understanding of adherence behavior. Conclusions: Should the ACCESS intervention prove feasible and acceptable, this research protocol will contribute to a shift in existent HIV research paradigms by offering a blueprint for technology-enabled peer-led interventions and models.

Adherence to the AWHONN Staffing Guidelines as Perceived by Labor Nurses

Simpson, K. R., Lyndon, A., Spetz, J., Gay, C. L., & Landstrom, G. L. (2019). Nursing for Women’s Health, 23(3), 217-223. 10.1016/j.nwh.2019.03.003
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the degree to which registered nurses perceive their labor and delivery units to be adhering to Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) staffing guidelines. Design: Prospective, cross-sectional study via an online survey of labor nurses recruited from hospitals in three states. Setting/Local Problem: In late 2016 and early 2017, labor nurses in selected hospitals in California, Michigan, and New Jersey were contacted via e-mail invitation to participate in a study about nursing care during labor and birth. Nurse leaders in each hospital facilitated the invitations. Participants: A total of 615 labor nurses from 67 hospitals. Intervention/Measurements: Descriptive statistics and linear regression models were used for data analysis. Results: Most nurses reported that the AWHONN nurse staffing guidelines were frequently or always followed in all aspects of care surveyed. Hospitals with annual birth volumes of 500 to 999 range were significantly more likely than hospitals with 2,500 or more annual births to be perceived as compliant with AWHONN staffing guidelines. Conclusion: When the AWHONN staffing guidelines were first published in 2010, there was concern among some nurse leaders that they would not be adopted into clinical practice, yet nurses in our sample overwhelmingly perceived their hospitals to be guideline compliant. There remains much more work to be done to determine nurse-sensitive outcomes for maternity care and to ensure that all women in labor in the United States are cared for by nurses who are not overburdened or distracted by being assigned more women than can be safely handled. In our survey of 615 labor nurses, most reported that the AWHONN nurse staffing guidelines were frequently or always followed in all aspects of care surveyed.

Adulterants and altruism: A qualitative investigation of “drug checkers” in North America

Palamar, J. J., Acosta, P., Sutherland, R., Shedlin, M. G., & Barratt, M. J. (2019). International Journal of Drug Policy, 74, 160-169. 10.1016/j.drugpo.2019.09.017
Abstract
Background: “Drug checking” has become a common harm reduction method used to test illicit substances, such as ecstasy, for purity and/or the presence of adulterants. Formal drug-checking services have been operating for decades, and the use of personal reagent test kits appears to be relatively common; however, little attention has been devoted to understanding the role and broader experiences of ‘drug-checkers’ (i.e., people who test their own and/or other people's substances). As such, it remains unknown who is engaging in this practice, their motivations for drug-checking, and what barriers they may experience. We addressed this research gap by interviewing people who check drugs about their experiences, with a goal of better understanding drug checking practices. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 32 adults in North America who reported testing drugs. Coding was conducted in an inductive manner and thematic analysis was used to identify relevant themes. Results: Over half (56.2%) of our sample was affiliated with a drug checking organization. Among non-affiliated checkers (43.8%), the majority (57.1%) tested for friends, 21.4% tested only for themselves, and 21.4% were people who sold drugs and tested for their clients. Motivations were driven largely by altruism, described by checkers as wanting to protect their peers from exposure to adulterants. People interviewed who sold drugs were altruistic in the same manner. Barriers to checking—particularly at nightclubs and festivals—included perceived illegality of test kits and denied approval to test drugs at venues, although many checkers circumvented this barrier by checking drugs without such approval. Conclusions: Drug checkers in North America seek to educate people who use drugs about the risk of exposure to unexpected substance types, but they face various barriers. Policy change could help ensure that these potentially life-saving services can be provided without fear of fines and/or criminal prosecution.

Advancing Long-Term Care Science Through Using Common Data Elements: Candidate Measures for Care Outcomes of Personhood, Well-Being, and Quality of Life

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Age and regional disparity in HIV education among migrants in China: Migrants population dynamic monitoring survey, 2014-2015

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Analgesic prescribing trends in a national sample of older veterans with osteoarthritis: 2012-2017

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Abstract
Few investigations examine patterns of opioid and nonopioid analgesic prescribing and concurrent pain intensity ratings before and after institution of safer prescribing programs such as the October 2013 Veterans Health Administration system-wide Opioid Safety Initiative (OSI) implementation. We conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post observational study of all older U.S. veterans (≥50 years old) with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip. All associated outpatient analgesic prescriptions and outpatient pain intensity ratings from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2016, were analyzed with segmented regression of interrupted time series. Standardized monthly rates for each analgesic class (total, opioid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, acetaminophen, and other study analgesics) were analyzed with segmented negative binomial regression models with overall slope, step, and slope change. Similarly, segmented linear regression was used to analyze pain intensity ratings and percentage of those reporting pain. All models were additionally adjusted for age, sex, and race. Before OSI implementation, total analgesic prescriptions showed a steady rise, abruptly decreasing to a flat trajectory after OSI implementation. This trend was primarily due to a decrease in opioid prescribing after OSI. Total prescribing after OSI implementation was partially compensated by continuing increased prescribing of other study analgesics as well as a significant rise in acetaminophen prescriptions (post-OSI). No changes in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescribing were seen. A small rise in the percentage of those reporting pain but not mean pain intensity ratings continued over the study period with no changes associated with OSI. Changes in analgesic prescribing trends were not paralleled by changes in reported pain intensity for older veterans with osteoarthritis.

Assessing geriatric capacity building needs in public hospitals in Mexico

Squires, A., Caceres, B., Bub, L., & Negrete Redondo, M. I. (2019). International Journal of Older People Nursing. 10.1111/opn.12262
Abstract
AIMS To conduct a needs assessment of public hospitals in Mexico to determine workforce specific capacity building needs in the care of older people. BACKGROUND The older population in Mexico is growing rapidly. The healthcare system and workforce may not be prepared to handle the needs of older people, especially those with chronic illnesses who are also disadvantaged socioeconomically. Determining workforce and system needs is important to strategically develop capacity. METHODS A needs assessment using a pragmatic qualitative approach structured this study. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with healthcare professionals at five public hospitals in Mexico. Directed content analysis techniques analysed the data. RESULTS Ninety-two healthcare professionals participated in the study. Three themes emerged, including geriatric service delivery, social changes and human resources for health. Participants reported a lack of gerontology knowledge and related clinical skills deficits to provide care for hospitalised elders and expressed emotional distress related to the lack of resources in their institutions. All healthcare professionals expressed strong concern at the social toll the ageing population had on families. The support of government organisations emerged as a facilitator for adoption of geriatric care principles. CONCLUSIONS This qualitative study uncovered important data to inform the implementation of quality improvement and capacity building models for older people care in Mexico. There appears to be strong potential for a culturally appropriate translation of high-income country older people care models within the Mexican healthcare context. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Findings suggests there is a need to increase geriatric capacity building among helathcare professionals in Mexico. This will be an important step in improving care for hospitalised older people.

Assessing geriatric capacity building needs in public hospitals in Mexico

Squires, A., Caceres, B., Bub, L., & Negrete Redondo, M. I. (2019). International Journal of Older People Nursing, 14(4). 10.1111/opn.12262
Abstract
Aims: To conduct a needs assessment of public hospitals in Mexico to determine workforce specific capacity building needs in the care of older people. Background: The older population in Mexico is growing rapidly. The healthcare system and workforce may not be prepared to handle the needs of older people, especially those with chronic illnesses who are also disadvantaged socioeconomically. Determining workforce and system needs is important to strategically develop capacity. Methods: A needs assessment using a pragmatic qualitative approach structured this study. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with healthcare professionals at five public hospitals in Mexico. Directed content analysis techniques analysed the data. Results: Ninety-two healthcare professionals participated in the study. Three themes emerged, including geriatric service delivery, social changes and human resources for health. Participants reported a lack of gerontology knowledge and related clinical skills deficits to provide care for hospitalised elders and expressed emotional distress related to the lack of resources in their institutions. All healthcare professionals expressed strong concern at the social toll the ageing population had on families. The support of government organisations emerged as a facilitator for adoption of geriatric care principles. Conclusions: This qualitative study uncovered important data to inform the implementation of quality improvement and capacity building models for older people care in Mexico. There appears to be strong potential for a culturally appropriate translation of high-income country older people care models within the Mexican healthcare context. Implications for practice: Findings suggests there is a need to increase geriatric capacity building among helathcare professionals in Mexico. This will be an important step in improving care for hospitalised older people.

Association between dying experience and place of death: Urban-rural differences among older Chinese adults

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Association between Dying Experience and Place of Death: Urban-Rural Differences among Older Chinese Adults

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Association Between Health Literacy and Medication Adherence Among Hispanics with Hypertension

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Association of Obesity with DNA Methylation Age Acceleration in African American Mothers from the InterGEN Study

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The association of sexual dysfunction with race in women with gynecologic malignancies

Frimer,, Turker, L. B., Shankar, V., Cardaci, R., Van Arsdale, A. R., Rosenthal, E., Kuo, D. Y., Goldberg, G. L., & Nevadunsky, N. (2019). Gynecologic Oncology Reports, 30. 10.1016/j.gore.2019.100495
Abstract
Gynecologic cancer survivors report sexual health among their highest concerns. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) in survivors of gynecologic malignancies and to evaluate the association of sexual function with race, ethnicity and treatment modality. In this study, survivors of endometrial, cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancer who presented to the gynecologic oncology practice were asked to self-administer the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) survey to evaluate their sexual function. The prevalence of SD was estimated and its association with demographic and clinical co-variates was analyzed. Of the 155 participants, the prevalence of SD was 44.5% (95%CI: 36.7–52.7). Patients were significantly more likely to report SD if they did not currently have a partner (69% vs 22% p < .01). Abstinence within six months of their cancer diagnosis was also associated with SD (72% vs 26% p < .01). Patients who self-identified as black race compared to white race were three times more likely to have SD (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 1.1–14.3). Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy compared to those who did not among the entire cohort had an increased risk of SD (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.2–9.6). In our diverse population, almost half of our patients were identified to have SD. Black as compared to white race reported significantly higher sexual dysfunction. An increased risk for sexual dysfunction was observed among those women who received chemotherapy and radiation with or without surgery. Precis: Survivorship is an important issue for women with gynecologic malignancies. This study addresses the high rates of sexual dysfunction in a racially diverse patient population.

Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment in the Dominican Republic: Perspectives of Focus Group Participants in the Santo Domingo Area

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Building Interprofessional Teams Through Partnerships to Address Quality

Cortes, T. (2019). Nursing Science Quarterly, 32(4), 288-290. 10.1177/0894318419864343
Abstract
Interprofessional collaborative education and practice is essential in the current complex healthcare climate. Barriers to interprofessional education include difficulty scheduling joint activities amid the silos of discipline-specific curricula and the lack of urgency by faculty to find innovative ways to commit to interprofessional training. Barriers in practice include poor understanding of the roles of different professionals and lack of awareness of the concept because the people in the workforce were mostly educated before interprofessional practice and education were prioritized by national bodies representing academic professions. The author of this paper describes opportunities for interprofessional education and practice and describes a way to create an educational-practice partnership to drive quality in healthcare settings.

Cardioprotective medication adherence among patients with coronary heart disease in China: a systematic review.

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Cardiovascular Risk in Middle-Aged and Older Immigrants: Exploring Residency Period and Health Insurance Coverage

Sadarangani, T., Trinh-Shevrin, C., Chyun, D., Yu, G., & Kovner, C. (2019). Journal of Nursing Scholarship. 10.1111/jnu.12465
Abstract
Purpose: It is reported that while immigrants are, initially, healthier than the native-born upon resettlement, this advantage erodes over time. In the United States, uninsured aging immigrants are increasingly experiencing severe complications of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to compare overall CVD risk and explore the importance of health insurance coverage on CVD risk relative to other health access barriers, from 2007 to 2012, in recent and long-term immigrants >50 years of age. Methods: This study was based on secondary cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N = 1,920). The primary outcome, CVD risk category (high or low), was determined using the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association Pooled Cohort equation. Differences between immigrant groups were examined using independent-samples t tests and chi-square analysis. The association between insurance and CVD risk was explored using a hierarchical block logistic regression model, in which variables were entered in a predetermined order. Changes in pseudo R 2 measured whether health insurance explained variance in cardiac risk beyond other variables. Results: Recent immigrants had lower overall CVD risk than long-term immigrants but were twice as likely to be uninsured and had higher serum glucose and lipid levels. Based on regression models, being uninsured contributed to CVD risk beyond other health access determinants, and CVD risk was pronounced among recent immigrants who were uninsured. Conclusions: Health insurance coverage plays an essential part in a comprehensive approach to mitigating CVD risk for aging immigrants, particularly recent immigrants whose cardiovascular health is susceptible to deterioration. Clinical Relevance: Nurses are tasked with recognizing the unique social and physical vulnerabilities of aging immigrants and accounting for these in care plans. In addition to helping them access healthcare coverage and affordable medication, nurses and clinicians should prioritize low-cost lifestyle interventions that reduce CVD risk, especially diet and exercise programs.

Caregiver Contribution to Self-care in Patients With Heart Failure: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

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Challenges to Diabetes Self-Management in Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Ramchandani, N., Way, N., D’Eramo Melkus, G., & Sullivan-Bolyai, S. (2019). Diabetes Educator. 10.1177/0145721719861349
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study undergirded by Meleis’s Transition Framework was to explore developmental, situational, and organizational challenges experienced by a diverse group of emerging adults (18-29 years old) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Their perspectives on creating a developmentally informed diabetes self-management (DSM) program that supports transitional care were also explored. Methods: A purposive sample of emerging adults with T1DM was recruited from the pediatric and adult diabetes clinics of an urban academic medical center. Those who consented participated in either a single focus group or a single interview. Self-reported demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results: The sample was comprised of 21 emerging adults, with an average age of 23.6 ± 2.6 years, diabetes duration of 14.7 ± 5.0 years, and 71% female. Four main themes emerged: (1) finding a balance between diabetes and life, (2) the desire to be in control of their diabetes, (3) the hidden burden of diabetes, and (4) the desire to have a connection with their diabetes provider. Use of insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors and attendance at diabetes camp decreased some of the DSM challenges. Different groups of individuals had different perspectives on living with diabetes and different approaches to DSM. Conclusions: The emerging adults in this study had a strong desire to be in good glycemic control. However, all participants described having a hard time balancing DSM with other competing life priorities. They also desired personalized patient-provider interactions with their diabetes care provider in clinical follow-up services. Even though the study sample was small, important themes emerged that warrant further exploration.

Chinese Dementia Caregiver Intervention Research and its Future Development

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Chinese Physicians’ Perspectives on the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Hypertension Guideline: A Mobile App-Based Survey

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A clinical exemplar: Assessment of knowledge regarding obesity preventative methods among african american children ages 9 to 11.

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Cognitive function and oral health among ageing adults

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Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children: An Update for the Forensic Nurse

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