Publications

Publications

Termination and Outcome Evaluation

Conklin, D., & Wheeler, K. (2022). In Psychotherapy for the Advanced Practice Nurse.

Changes in Gut Microbiome Associated With Co-Occurring Symptoms Development During Chemo-Radiation for Rectal Cancer: A Proof of Concept Study

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Dialectical Behavior Therapy: A Client with Complex Trauma

Conklin, D. (2021). In C. Knight (Ed.), Case Study Approach to Psychotherapy for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses. Springer.

Factors Associated with Dissatisfaction in Medical Care Quality among Older Medicare Beneficiaries Suffering from Mental Illness

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Higher Levels of Stress Are Associated With a Significant Symptom Burden in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy

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A Microbial Relationship Between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Depressive Symptoms

Perez, N. B., Wright, F., & Vorderstrasse, A. (2021). Biological Research for Nursing, 23(1), 50-64. 10.1177/1099800420940787
Abstract
Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with depressive symptoms, but this relationship is poorly understood. Emerging research suggests that gut microbes are associated with symptoms in persons with IBS. The purpose of this integrative review is to describe the state of the science of the microbial relationship between IBS and depressive symptoms. PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO, and Web of Science were searched using “irritable bowel syndrome,” “microbiome,” “depression,” and related terms. Included articles were published in peer reviewed journals in English from 2009 to 2018. Studies on inflammatory bowel conditions, extra-intestinal microbiomes, or animal models were excluded. Fourteen quantitative studies met inclusion criteria, were critically appraised, and were analyzed using the Whittemore and Knafl method. Analysis revealed a consistently lower microbial biodiversity and lower proportions of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in persons with IBS and co-occurring depressive symptoms. Inclusion of participants with moderate or greater depressive symptoms scores distinguished the studies which reported microbe differences in depressive symptoms. The results of this integrative review underscore the need for studies with larger samples and inclusion of a larger range of depressive symptoms guided by an overarching conceptual framework, such as the biopsychosocial ecology framework. This effort needs to be combined with longitudinal designs in order to identify related microbial markers.

Prescribed Walking for Glycemic Control and Symptom Management in Patients without Diabetes Undergoing Chemotherapy

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Actual use of multiple health monitors among older adults with diabetes: Pilot study

Zheng, Y., Weinger, K., Greenberg, J., Burke, L. E., Sereika, S. M., Patience, N., Gregas, M. C., Li, Z., Qi, C., Yamasaki, J., & Munshi, M. N. (2020). Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22(3). 10.2196/15995
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Previous studies have reported older adults perceptions of using health monitors; however, no studies have examined the actual use of multiple health monitors for lifestyle changes over time among older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine the actual use of multiple health monitors for lifestyle changes over 3 months among older adults with T2D. The secondary aim was to explore changes in caloric intake and physical activity (PA) over 3 months. Methods: This was a single-group study lasting 3 months. The study sample included participants who were aged .65 years with a diagnosis of T2D. Participants were recruited through fliers posted at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Participants attended five 60-min, biweekly group sessions, which focused on self-monitoring, goal setting, self-regulation to achieve healthy eating and PA habits, and the development of problem-solving skills. Participants were provided with the Lose It! app to record daily food intake and devices such as a Fitbit Alta for monitoring PA, a Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meter, and a Bluetooth-enabled digital scale. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. Results: Of the enrolled participants (N=9), the sample was white (8/9, 89%) and female (4/9, 44%), with a mean age of 76.4 years (SD 6.0; range 69-89 years), 15.7 years (SD 2.0) of education, 33.3 kg/m2 (SD 3.1) BMI, and 7.4% (SD 0.8) hemoglobin A1c. Over the 84 days of self-monitoring, the mean percentage of days using the Lose It!, Fitbit Alta, blood glucose meter, and scale were 82.7 (SD 17.6), 85.2 (SD 19.7), 65.3 (SD 30.1), and 53.0 (SD 34.5), respectively. From baseline to completion of the study, the mean daily calorie intake was 1459 (SD 661) at week 1, 1245 (SD 554) at week 11, and 1333 (SD 546) at week 12, whereas the mean daily step counts were 5618 (SD 3654) at week 1, 5792 (SD 3814) at week 11, and 4552 (SD 3616) at week 12. The mean percentage of weight loss from baseline was 4.92% (SD 0.25). The dose of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin was reduced in 55.6% (5/9) of the participants. Conclusions: The results from the pilot study are encouraging and suggest the need for a larger study to confirm the outcomes. In addition, a study design that includes a control group with educational sessions but without the integration of technology would offer additional insight to understand the value of mobile health in behavior changes and the health outcomes observed during this pilot study.

Adaptation and Piloting for Hospice Social Workers of Aliviado Dementia Care, a Dementia Symptom Management Program

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An Adapted Conceptual Model Integrating Palliative Care in Serious Illness and Multiple Chronic Conditions

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Adapting Andersen's expanded behavioral model of health services use to include older adults receiving long-term services and supports

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Addressing burnout syndrome from a critical care specialty organization perspective

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Adherence Self-Management and the Influence of Contextual Factors Among Emerging Adults With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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Advance Care Planning Engagement and End-of-life Preference Among Older Chinese Americans: Do Family Relationships and Immigrant Status Matter?

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Advance Directive Completion and Its Associated Factors Among Older Chinese Americans

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African Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup L2 Is Associated with Slower Decline of β-cell Function and Lower Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in Non-Hispanic, Black Women Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Sun, J., Brown, T. T., Tong, W., Samuels, D., Tien, P., Aissani, B., Aouizerat, B., Villacres, M., Kuniholm, M. H., Gustafson, D., Michel, K., Cohen, M., Schneider, M., Adimora, A. A., Ali, M. K., Bolivar, H., & Hulgan, T. (2020). Clinical Infectious Diseases, 71(8), E218-E225. 10.1093/cid/ciaa026
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Susceptibility to metabolic diseases may be influenced by mitochondrial genetic variability among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH), but remains unexplored in populations with African ancestry. We investigated the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and the homeostatic model assessments of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), as well as incident diabetes mellitus (DM), among Black women living with or at risk for HIV. Methods: Women without DM who had fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) data for ≥2 visits were included. Haplogroups were inferred from genotyping data using HaploGrep. HOMA-B and HOMA-IR were calculated using FG and FI data. Incident DM was defined by a combination of FG ≥ 126 mg/dL, the use of DM medication, a DM diagnosis, or hemoglobin A1c ≥ 6.5%. We compared HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, and incident DM by haplogroups and assessed the associations between HOMA-B and HOMA-IR and DM by haplogroup. Results: Of 1288 women (933 living with HIV and 355 living without HIV), PLWH had higher initial HOMA-B and HOMA-IR than people living without HIV. PLWH with haplogroup L2 had a slower decline in HOMA-B per year (Pinteraction =. 02) and a lower risk of incident DM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI],. 32-.82) than PLWH with other haplogroups after adjustments for age, body mass index, combination antiretroviral therapy use, CD4 cell counts, and HIV RNA. The impact of HOMA-IR on incident DM was less significant in those with haplogroup L2, compared to non-L2 (HR, 1.28 [95% CI,. 70-2.38] vs 4.13 [95% CI, 3.28-5.22], respectively; Pinteraction <. 01), among PLWH. Conclusions: Mitochondrial genetic variation is associated with β-cell functions and incident DM in non-Hispanic, Black women with HIV and alters the relationship between insulin resistance and DM.

Aging in America: How COVID-19 Will Change Care, Coverage, and Compassion

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Alterations in Patterns of Gene Expression and Perturbed Pathways in the Gut-Brain Axis Are Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea

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Anxiety about aging, resilience and health Status among Chinese older adults: Findings from Honolulu and Wuhan

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Anxious, Depressed, and Planning for the Future: Advance Care Planning in Diverse Older Adults

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Assessing providers’ approach to hypertension management at a large, private hospital in Kampala, Uganda

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Assessment and Management of HIV Distal Sensory Peripheral Neuropathy: Understanding the Symptoms

Anastasi, J. K., & Pakhomova, A. M. (2020). Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 16(4), 276-280. 10.1016/j.nurpra.2019.12.019
Abstract
Abstract
Distal sensory peripheral neuropathy (HIV-DSP) affects upwards of 50% of people living with HIV. Causing often debilitating symptoms of tingling, numbness, and burning, HIV-DSP can result in disability, unemployment, and low quality of life. Comorbidities further complicate nursing care, heightening risk of polypharmacy and symptom exacerbation. Therefore, a neurologic sensory assessment, combined with the patient's self-report of symptoms, can help nurse practitioners visualize, quantify, and understand symptoms. Common pharmacologic interventions include antiepileptics, antidepressants, analgesics, and medical marijuana. The complexity of care for individuals with HIV-DSP merits a comprehensive approach. Implications for practice include interdisciplinary management with neurologists, podiatrists, mental health providers, and nurse-led counseling inclusive of patient safety teaching.

Association between childhood conditions and arthritis among middle-aged and older adults in China: The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study

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The Association between Dairy Intake and Body Composition among South Asian Adults from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

Murphy, B., Talegawkar, S. A., O’Connor, J., Kandula, N. R., Kanaya, A. M., Allison, M. A., & Parekh, N. (2020). British Journal of Nutrition. 10.1017/S0007114520005061
Abstract
Abstract
South Asians, who are at a disproportionately greater risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), represent a rapidly growing population in the United States (U.S.). The relationship between dairy, a major component of South Asian diets, and body composition- A n established risk factor for ASCVD, is unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between dairy intake and multiple measures of body composition (body mass index, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, abdominal lean mass, subcutaneous, visceral, and intermuscular fat areas) among South Asian adults in the U.S. A baseline analysis was conducted using existing data from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America cohort. In women, the highest (>1.9 servings/day) vs. lowest (<1 serving/day) tertile of dairy intake was associated with a 53% lower odds of a waist circumference >80 cm (95%CI:0.25,0.89,ptrend<0.05). No associations were observed between dairy intake and measures of body composition. However, greater than 3 servings of low-fat yogurt per week was associated with a 9.9 cm2 lower visceral fat area (95%CI:-19.07,-0.72,p<0.05) and 2.3 cm2 lower intermuscular fat area (95%CI:-3.76,-0.79,p<0.05) as compared to those with ≤3 servings per week. Milk and cheese (whole/low-fat) were not associated with body composition measures. These analyses suggest that higher consumption of low-fat yogurt is associated with lower visceral and intermuscular fat in the whole sample, and women with higher dairy intake have lower waist circumference. Our study supports dietary incorporation of dairy, and also recognizes the utility of multi-dimensional measures of central adiposity.

Association Between Early Cognitive Impairment and Midterm Functional Outcomes Among Chinese Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Longitudinal Study

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