John Merriman

Faculty

John Merriman Headshot

John Merriman

AOCNS PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 212 998 5375

433 First Ave
Room
New York, NY 10010
United States

Accepting PhD students

John Merriman's additional information

John Merriman, PhD, RN, AOCNS, is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. His primary research interest is improving cognitive function in postmenopausal women with breast cancer using stress management. He is particularly interested in how multiple determinants of health, including biobehavioral and social determinants, impact the efficacy of stress management interventions in this population.

His recent study was funded by a K99/R00 award from the National Institute of Nursing Research (NR015473). This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and potential impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, contrasting it with a health enhancement program, on cognitive function in postmenopausal women undergoing aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer.

Prof. Merriman is President-Elect of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics. Before joining NYU, he completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and his PhD and MS in Nursing from the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing.

PhD, Nursing - University of California San Francisco
MS, Nursing - University of California San Francisco
BS, Communication - Mississippi College

Chronic disease
Complementary/integrative health

American Nurses Association
Eastern Nursing Research Society
International Society of Nurses in Genetics
Oncology Nursing Society
Sigma Theta Tau International

Faculty Honors Awards

Postdoctoral Alumni Award, University of Pittsburgh Postdoctoral Association (2016)
International inductee, Sigma Theta Tau (2006)

Publications

Complex Care Needs at the End of Life for Seriously Ill Adults With Multiple Chronic Conditions

Murali, K. P., Merriman, J. D., Yu, G., Vorderstrasse, A., Kelley, A. S., & Brody, A. A. (2023). Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 25(3), 146-155. 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000946
Abstract
Abstract
Understanding the complex care needs of seriously ill adults with multiple chronic conditions with and without cancer is critical for the delivery of high-quality serious illness and palliative care at the end of life. The objective of this secondary data analysis of a multisite randomized clinical trial in palliative care was to elucidate the clinical profile and complex care needs of seriously ill adults with multiple chronic conditions and to highlight key differences among those with and without cancer at the end of life. Of the 213 (74.2%) older adults who met criteria for multiple chronic conditions (eg, 2 or more chronic conditions requiring regular care with limitations of daily living), 49% had a diagnosis of cancer. Hospice enrollment was operationalized as an indicator for severity of illness and allowed for the capture of complex care needs of those deemed to be nearing the end of life. Individuals with cancer had complex symptomatology with a higher prevalence of nausea, drowsiness, and poor appetite and end of life and lower hospice enrollment. Individuals with multiple chronic conditions without cancer had lower functional status, greater number of medications, and higher hospice enrollment. The care of seriously ill older adults with multiple chronic conditions requires tailored approaches to improve outcomes and quality of care across health care settings, particularly at the end of life.

Multiple Chronic Conditions among Seriously Ill Adults Receiving Palliative Care

Murali, K. P., Yu, G., Merriman, J. D., Vorderstrasse, A., Kelley, A. S., & Brody, A. A. (2023). Western Journal of Nursing Research, 45(1), 14-24. 10.1177/01939459211041174
Abstract
Abstract
The objective of this study was to characterize multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) among seriously ill adults receiving palliative care at the end of life. A latent class analysis was conducted to identify latent subgroups of seriously ill older adults based on a baseline Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) measurement, a measure of comorbidity burden, and mortality risk. The three latent subgroups were: (1) low to moderate CCI with MCC, (2) high CCI with MCC, and (3) high CCI and metastatic cancer. The “low to moderate CCI and MCC” subgroup included older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, dementia, diabetes, and lymphoma. A “high CCI and MCC” subgroup included individuals with severe illness including liver or renal disease among other MCCs. A “high CCI and metastatic cancer” included all participants with metastatic cancer. This study sheds light on the MCC profile of seriously ill adults receiving palliative care.

Profiles of Work and Quality of Life among Young Adult Cancer Survivors

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Exploration of Relationships Between Symptoms, Work Characteristics, and Quality of Life in Young Adult Hematologic Cancer Survivors

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"now Everybody Is Thinking about Things Like That." Young Adult Cancer Survivors Reimagining Work during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Financial Toxicity in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Concept Analysis

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An integrative review: Women’s psychosocial vulnerability in relation to paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis

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Latent Class Analysis of Symptom Burden among Seriously Ill Adults at the End of Life

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Limb Volume Changes and Activities of Daily Living: A Prospective Study

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Survivors’ Dilemma: Young Adult Cancer Survivors’ Perspectives of Work-Related Goals

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Media