Faculty

Nancy L Van Devanter headshot

Nancy L Van Devanter

Professor

1 212 998 5328

433 First Avenue
Room 670
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Since the 1990s, Dr. Van Devanter has conducted behavioral intervention research integrating a community based participatory research approach into the development and testing of theory-driven interventions to promote health and reduce disease in populations with significant health disparities in HIV, STDs and tobacco related disease. She has also worked in close collaboration with state and local health departments to develop programs improve community level health and public health practice. Since coming to NYU she has been involved in numerous interdisciplinary collaborative studies with the NYU School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Public Health Program.

Education

DrPH, 1992, Columbia University School of Public Health
MPH, 1985, Harvard School of Public Health
EdM, 1975, Boston University
BS, 1974, Boston University
Diploma, 1964, St Agnes School of Nursing

Honors and awards

Fellow, American Academy of Nursing (2011)
Fellow, New York Academy of Medicine (2011)
Public Health Achievement Award, New York City Department of Health/ Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University (1999)
Fellowship in STD Prevention Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1999)
Commendation, Office the Secretary, US Department of Health and Human Services for contribution to the National AIDS Education Prevention Program (1998)

Specialties

HIV/AIDS

Professional membership

American Nurses Association
American Public Health Association
American Sociological Association
Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science
Public Health Association of New York City

Publications

Publications

Nursing Education to Reduce Use of Tobacco and Alternative Tobacco Products: Change Is Imperative

Van Devanter, N., Katigbak, C., Naegle, M., Zhou, S., Sherman, S., & Weitzman, M. (2017). Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, 23(6), 414-421. 10.1177/1078390317711252
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tobacco use continues to be the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To assess perceived tobacco educational preparation of undergraduate and graduate nurses in a large urban university. DESIGN: A cross-sectional web-based survey of all nursing students in an urban college of nursing was conducted to assess perceived tobacco educational content, skills, and self-efficacy for cessation counseling with patients who smoke cigarettes and use alternative tobacco products (e.g., hookah and e-cigarettes). RESULTS: Participants reported the most education about health effects of tobacco use (67%), and less than 6% reported education about alternative tobacco products. While the majority of nurses agreed that advising patients to quit is a priority, less than 40% reported receiving sufficient training in cessation counseling. CONCLUSIONS: There continues to be a compelling need articulated by leaders in tobacco policy and research over the past decade for a more vigorous response by nurses to the tobacco epidemic.

Knowledge, Beliefs, Behaviors, and Social Norms Related to Use of Alternative Tobacco Products Among Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Students in an Urban U.S. University Setting

Van Devanter, N., Zhou, S., Katigbak, C., Naegle, M., Sherman, S., & Weitzman, M. (2016). Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 48(2), 147-153. 10.1111/jnu.12192
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess nursing students' knowledge, beliefs, behaviors, and social norms regarding use of alternative tobacco products (ATPs). Design and Methods: This anonymous online survey was conducted with all students enrolled in a college of nursing. The survey utilized measures from several national tobacco studies to assess knowledge and beliefs about ATPs (hookahs, cigars or cigarillos, bidis, kreteks, smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarettes) compared to cigarettes, health effects of ATPs, personal use of ATPs, and social norms. Data were analyzed in SPSS 22.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics and frequencies were performed for basic sociodemographic data. Paired samples t tests were performed to determine differences for scaled measures. Findings: Nursing students demonstrated very low levels of knowledge about ATPs and their health consequences, despite high rates of ATP personal use. About 76% of participants reported use of one or more ATPs once or more in their lifetimes. A greater proportion of students had used hookahs or waterpipes (39.6%) compared to cigarettes (32.7%). Conclusions: Nurses' lack of knowledge about the emerging use and health threats associated with ATPs may undermine their ability to provide appropriate tobacco cessation counseling. Research is needed to identify gaps in nurses' education regarding tobacco cessation counseling and to develop new counseling approaches specific to use of ATPs. Clinical Relevance: Nurses play critical roles in counseling their patients for tobacco cessation. Further research and education about the risks presented by ATPs are critical to reducing excess tobacco-related mortality.

A narrative of the attending nurse model implementation

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The attending nurse: An evolving model for integrating nursing education and practice

Fulmer, T., Cathcart, E., Glassman, K., Budin, W., Naegle, M., & Van Devanter, N. (2011). Open Nursing Journal, 5, 9-13. 10.2174/1874434601105010009
Abstract
The discipline of nursing continues to evolve in keeping with the dramatic expansion of scientific knowledge, technology, and a concomitant increase in complexity of patient care in all practice settings. Changing patient demographics require complex planning for co-morbidities associated with chronic diseases and life-saving advances that have altered mortality in ways never before imagined. These changes in practice, coupled with findings from sophisticated nursing research and the continuous development of new nursing knowledge, call for realignments of the relationships among academic faculty in schools of nursing, advanced practice nurse administrators, and staff nurses at the forefront of practice. This article offers a model designed to bridge the gaps among academic settings, administrative offices and the euphemistic "bedsides" where staff nurses practice. Here we describe the nurse attending model in place at the New York University Langone Medical Center (NYULMC) and provide qualitative data that support progress in our work.