Tina Sadarangani

Faculty

Tina Sadarangani headshot

Tina Sadarangani

ANP-C GNP-BC PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 212 992 7183

433 FIRST AVENUE
Room
NEW YORK, NY 10016
United States

Accepting PhD students

Tina Sadarangani's additional information

Tina Sadarangani is an NIH-funded Principal Investigator and board certified primary care nurse practitioner. She is cross-appointed as an assistant professor in the NYU School of Medicine Department of Population Health. Her program of research is underscored by a profound commitment to advancing the health of minoritized older adults by leveraging the strengths of community-based adult day health care centers to target health disparities. In the last three years, she has expanded her program of research to focus, specifically, on identifying and addressing the healthcare needs of cognitively impaired older immigrants, by using the adult day health center as a platform for the delivery of culturally and linguistically congruent care. Her on-going collaborations with the California Association of Adult Day Services, as well as other community-based organizations, have demonstrated that integrating adult day centers into the healthcare continuum contributes to reductions in avoidable healthcare utilization. 

Sadarangani’s latest work focuses on improving communication between adult day centers and primary care providers using low-cost mobile technology. She recently received a K23 Career Development Award from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) as well as an R21 from NIA.  She previously received a Career Development Award from the NIA IMPACT Collaboratory, and currently serves as an Adjunct Professor and member of the Collaboratory’s Patient and Caregiver Relevant Outcomes (PCRO) core. She holds prior degrees from Georgetown University (Anthropology), the University of Pennsylvania (MSN), and NYU Meyers (BSN, PhD).

PhD - New York University
MS - University of Pennsylvania
BSN - New York University
BA - Georgetown University

Gerontology
Immigrants
Health Policy
Chronic disease
Underserved populations
Vulnerable & marginalized populations
Health Services Research

American Gerontological Society
American Heart Association
National Gerontological Nurses Association
Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society

Faculty Honors Awards

Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, New York University (2019)
Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, New York University (2018)
Hermann Biggs Health Policy Scholar, Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation (2017)
Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, New York University (2017)
Valedictorian, New York University (2017)
Patricia G. Archbold Award, National Hartford Centers for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (2016)
Hillman Alumni Network Innovation Fellowship, Hillman Alumni Network (2016)
Hermann Biggs Health Policy Scholar, Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation (2016)
Doctoral Audience Choice Winner, New York University (2016)
Research Podium Presentation Award, Gerontology Advanced Practice Nurses Association (2016)
Patricia G. Archbold Award, National Hartford Centers for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (2015)
Spirit of Hillman Award, Hillman Alumni Network (2014)
Patricia G. Archbold Award, National Hartford Centers for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (2014)
Phi Beta Kappa, Georgetown University
Summa Cum Laude, Georgetown University

Publications

Honoring Asian diversity by collecting Asian subpopulation data in health research

Niles, P. M., Jun, J., Lor, M., Ma, C., Sadarangani, T., Thompson, R., & Squires, A. (2022). Research in Nursing and Health, 45(3), 265-269. 10.1002/nur.22229

International migration and its influence on health

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Multimorbidity patterns in adult day health center clients with dementia: a latent class analysis

Sadarangani, T., Perissinotto, C., Boafo, J., Zhong, J., & Yu, G. (2022). BMC Geriatrics, 22(1). 10.1186/s12877-022-03206-0
Abstract
Abstract
Background: Persons living with dementia (PLWD) in adult day centers (ADCs) represent a complex and vulnerable population whose well-being is at risk based on numerous factors. Greater knowledge of the interaction between dementia, chronic conditions, and social determinants of health would enable ADCs to identify and target the use of their resources to better support clients in need of in-depth intervention. The purpose of this paper is to (a) classify PLWD in ADCs according to their level of medical complexity and (b) identify the demographic, functional, and clinical characteristics of those with the highest degree of medical complexity. Methods: This was a secondary data analysis of 3052 clients with a dementia diagnosis from 53 ADCs across the state of California between 2012 and 2019. The most common diagnosis codes were organized into 28 disease categories to enable a latent class analysis (LCA). Chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to examine differences among latent classes with respect to clinical and functional characteristics. Results: An optimal 4-class solution was chosen to reflect chronic conditions among PLWD: high medical complexity, moderate medical complexity, low medical complexity, and no medical complexity. Those in the high medical complexity were taking an average of 12.72 (+/− 6.52) medications and attending the ADC an average of 3.98 days (+/− 1.31) per week—values that exceeded any other class. They also experienced hospitalizations more than any other group (19.0%) and met requirements for the nursing facility level of care (77.4%). In addition, the group experienced the greatest frequency of bladder (57.5%) and bowel (15.7%) incontinence. Conclusions: Our results illustrate a high degree of medical complexity among PLWD in ADCs. A majority of PLWD not only have multimorbidity but are socially disadvantaged. Our results demonstrate that a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach that involves community partners such as ADCs is critically needed that addresses functional decline, loneliness, social isolation, and multimorbidity which can negatively impact PLWD.

A National Survey of Data Currently being Collected by Adult Day Service Centers Across the United States.

Sadarangani, T., Anderson, K., Vora, P., Missaelides, L., & Zagorski, W. (2022). Journal of Applied Gerontology, 41, 729-735. 10.1177/07334648211013974
Abstract
Abstract
An understanding of adult day service centers’ (ADC) impacts on clients’ health and well-being has been hampered by a lack of large-scale data. Standardizing data collection is critical to strengthening ADC programs, demonstrating their effectiveness, and enabling them to leverage additional funding streams beyond Medicaid. We distributed an electronic survey on current data collection efforts to ADCs nationally to determine categories of data ADCs are collecting related to clients’ health. In our sample (N = 248), only 32% of ADCs collected patient-level data for research and analysis—most commonly on activities of daily living, cognition, nutrition, and caregiver strain. However, validated assessment tools were used in less than 50% of the cases. ADCs are willing to collect data: More than 70% reported a willingness to participate in future studies. National studies piloting data collection protocols with uniform outcome measures are needed to advance the understanding of ADCs’ capabilities and impacts.

Engaging Nursing Assistants to Enhance Receptivity to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine

Sadarangani, T. R., David, D., & Travers, J. (2021). Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 22(6), 1125-1127. 10.1016/j.jamda.2021.03.016

Identifying research priorities in adult day centers to support evidence-based care of vulnerable older adults

Sadarangani, T., Zagorski, W., Parker, L., & Missaelides, L. (2021). Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 15(1), 127-131. 10.1353/cpr.2021.0012
Abstract
Abstract
Adult day centers (ADCs) are essential community resources that allow frail older adults to remain in their communities. Research demonstrates that ADC staff have the capacity to leverage their culturally and socially congruent relation-ships with clients and caregivers, to deliver evidence-based interventions that improve health outcomes. Yet, they remain a largely overlooked neighborhood resource for older adults with complex health care needs. The National Adult Day Services Association (NADSA) created a multistakeholder work group to identify priority areas for research to enhance the quality of services offered in ADCs and the delivery of evidence-based practices to clients. This perspective piece, which presents the workgroup’s findings in the form of key research priorities, is intended as practical guide for researchers seeking to align their research questions with the needs of ADCs and those they serve. In addition to identifying areas of further exploration, we discuss current studies being undertaken within the ADC setting.

A Qualitative Analysis of the Delivery of Person-Centered Nutrition to Asian Americans With Dementia in the Adult Day Health Care Setting

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“Advocating Every Single Day” so as Not to be Forgotten: Factors Supporting Resiliency in Adult Day Service Centers Amidst COVID-19-Related Closures

Sadarangani, T., Zhong, J., Vora, P., & Missaelides, L. (2021). Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 64(3), 291-302. 10.1080/01634372.2021.1879339
Abstract
Abstract
Adult day centers (ADCs) are nonresidential settings that support the health and social needs of vulnerable older adults. Due to ADCs’ congregate nature and participants’ compromised health status, many ADCs have been forced to close during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unknown how closures have impacted service delivery at ADCs. Guided by the Resiliency Activation Framework, we (a) identified consequences resulting from closures of ADCs during the COVID-19 pandemic and (b) described factors that have enabled the ADC community to remain resilient in the wake of challenges brought on by the pandemic. We conducted 2 focus groups in California (n = 12), and individual interviews with ADC staff members (n = 8) in 7 other states. The results of a directed content analysis revealed perceived declines in physical, cognitive, and mental health of ADC users and increased caregiver strain. Access to human, social, economic, and political capital were essential for supporting ADCs in buffering the impacts of the pandemic on the older adults they serve but were not consistently available. Research is urgently needed that quantifies the impacts of the pandemic on ADC users and their caregivers to inform policy and advocacy efforts in the wake of the pandemic.

Enriching Nutrition Programs to Better Serve the Needs of a Diversifying Aging Population

Sadarangani, T. R., Beasley, J. M., Yi, S. S., & Chodosh, J. (2020). Family and Community Health, 43(2), 100-105. 10.1097/FCH.0000000000000250
Abstract
Abstract
Racial minorities experience a high burden of food insecurity relative to non-Hispanic whites. Government-subsidized nutrition programs can positively impact food insecurity and nutritional risk among older adults. Yet, in New York City, where nearly 60% of people over 65 years are non-white, older minorities participate in government nutrition programs at very low rates. In this commentary, we focus on 2 programs: the Child and Adult Care Food Program and Older Americans Act Nutrition Services Programs. We identify opportunities for strengthening these programs to improve their reach and engagement with diverse older adults in New York City and similarly diverse urban communities.

Family- And person-centered interdisciplinary telehealth: Policy and practice implications following onset of the COVID-19 pandemic

Brody, A. A., Sadarangani, T., Jones, T. M., Convery, K., Groom, L., Bristol, A. A., & David, D. (2020). Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 46(9), 9-13. 10.3928/00989134-20200811-03
Abstract
Abstract
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth was thrust to the forefront, becoming one of the most predominant forms of care almost overnight. Despite years of research, practice, and policymaking, tenets for providing telehealth in an interdisciplinary, family- and person-centered fashion, and across a wide breadth of settings remain underdeveloped. In addition, although telehealth has the potential to increase equity in care, it can also further exacerbate disparities. The current article discusses the opening created by the pandemic and provides recommendations for how to make permanent changes in telehealth policy and practice to allow for interdisciplinary, person- and family-centered care while also taking care to address issues of equity and ethics and privacy issues related to telehealth and remote monitoring. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 46(9), 9-13.]