Yzette Lanier

Faculty

Yzette Lanier headshot

Yzette Lanier

Assistant Professor

1 212 998 5803
Accepting PhD students

Yzette Lanier's additional information

Yzette Lanier, PhD, is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. As a developmental psychologist, her research broadly centers on health promotion and disease prevention in communities of color, with a special focus on preventing HIV/STIs and unintended pregnancy among African American adolescents. Using health equity and strengths-based lenses, her research seeks to understand how individual, social, and cultural factors influence adolescents’ sexual decision-making. Lanier’s current research examines how adolescent romantic relationships influence sexual behaviors. Her long-term goal is to develop effective developmentally-appropriate, culturally tailored interventions that promote healthy romantic relationships and protective sexual behaviors among adolescents. In June 2016, Lanier was awarded $1.2 million from the CDC for HIV behavior intervention based on young black heterosexual couples' dynamics.  

Lanier earned her PhD and MS in developmental psychology at Howard University. She completed a T32 postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Health Equity Research at the University of Pennsylvania and a postdoctoral research fellowship in HIV prevention in communities of color at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

T32 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Center for Health Equity Research - University of Pennsylvania
Postdoctoral Research Fellowship for HIV Prevention in Communities of Color - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
PhD, Developmental Psychology - Howard University
MS, Developmental Psychology - Howard University
BS, Psychology - Howard University

Pediatric
Infectious disease
Families
Community/population health
HIV/AIDS
Vulnerable & marginalized populations

American Psychological Association
American Public Health Association
Association of Black Psychologists
Society for Research on Adolescence

Faculty Honors Awards

Visiting Scholar, Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University

Publications

Applying a Nursing Perspective to Address the Challenges Experienced by Cisgender Women in the HIV Status Neutral Care Continuum: A Review of the Literature

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Interpartner Concordance on Relationship Quality and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Young Pregnant and Parenting Couples

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Mental health burden among Black adolescents: the need for better assessment, diagnosis and treatment engagement

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Nurses at the frontline of public health emergency preparedness and response: lessons learned from the HIV/AIDS pandemic and emerging infectious disease outbreaks

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A Qualitative Investigation of Facilitators to Black and Latino Adolescent and Young Adults’ Participation in a Couple-Based HIV Prevention Study

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Inequities along the Depression Care Cascade in African American Women: An Integrative Review

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Methodological strategies to engage young black and Latino heterosexual couples in sexual and reproductive health research

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Successfully Recruiting Black and Hispanic/Latino Adolescents for Sexually Transmitted Infection and HIV Prevention Research

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Vital Voices: HIV Prevention and Care Interventions Developed for Disproportionately Affected Communities by Historically Underrepresented, Early-Career Scientists

Sutton, M. Y., Martinez, O., Brawner, B. M., Prado, G., Camacho-Gonzalez, A., Estrada, Y., Payne-Foster, P., Rodriguez-Diaz, C. E., Hussen, S. A., Lanier, Y., Van Den Berg, J. J., Malavé-Rivera, S. M., Hickson, D. M. A., & Fields, E. L. (2020). Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 10.1007/s40615-020-00908-2
Abstract
Abstract
Abstract: Background: HIV prevention interventions which support engagement in care and increased awareness of biomedical options, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), are highly desired for disproportionately affected Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx and gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) populations in the United States (US). However, in almost 40 years of HIV research, few interventions have been developed directly by and for these priority populations in domestic counties most at risk. We submit that interventions developed by early-career scientists who identify with and work directly with affected subgroups, and which include social and structural determinants of health, are vital as culturally tailored HIV prevention and care tools. Methods: We reviewed and summarized interventions developed from 2007 to 2020 by historically underrepresented early-career HIV prevention scientists in a federally funded research mentoring program. We mapped these interventions to determine which were in jurisdictions deemed as high priority (based on HIV burden) by national prevention strategies. Results: We summarized 11 HIV interventions; 10 (91%) of the 11 interventions are in geographic areas where HIV disparities are most concentrated and where new HIV prevention and care activities are focused. Each intervention addresses critical social and structural determinants of health disparities, and successfully reaches priority populations. Conclusion: Focused funding that supports historically underrepresented scientists and their HIV prevention and care intervention research can help facilitate reaching national goals to reduce HIV-related disparities and end the HIV epidemic. Maintaining these funding streams should remain a priority as one of the tools for national HIV prevention.

Interprofessional development of a livestream simulation activity to enhance an undergraduate nursing research course

Lanier, Y., Bryant, K., Budin, W. C., Marsaglia, M., Resto, D., Genee, J., Birk, K., Sultana, N., Carumba, R., & Jaravata, J. A. (2019). Nursing Education Perspectives, 40(1), 50-52. 10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000432
Abstract
Abstract
The article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an interactive simulation activity to enhance student engagement and comprehension of evidence-based practice principles. An interprofessional team of nurse educators, simulation experts, information technology specialists, and nursing informatics graduate students collaborated on the simulation design. The results of this project support the need to develop innovative learning strategies to facilitate nursing students' understanding of the relevance of evidence-based practice research to improve patient outcomes.