Faculty

Bei Wu headshot

Bei Wu

PhD

Dean's Professor in Global Health
Director, Global Health & Aging Research
Director for Research, Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing
Affiliated Professor, Ashman Department of Periodontology & Implant Dentistry

1 212 992 5951

433 First Avenue
Room 520
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Dr. Bei Wu joins NYU’s Rory Meyers College of Nursing as a fully tenured Professor of Nursing. She received her Bachelor of Law from Shanghai University and her PhD in Gerontology from University of Massachusetts Boston.

Dr. Wu’s career in gerontology has been distinguished by interdisciplinary collaborations with researchers in various disciplines (particularly in nursing and in dentistry) at many academic institutions and organizations in the U.S. and abroad. She has provided keynote presentations, lectures, and/or consultation in dozens of universities and organizations in the United States and globally, including China, Singapore, the Netherlands, Norway, and Turkey.  As Principal Investigator, she has led a significant number of projects supported by federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Her numerous publications cover a variety of issues related to aging and health, including long-term care, dementia, caregiving, and oral health.  She has served on a number of NIH review panels and is also a frequent grant reviewer for the Research Fund of Hong Kong Food and Health Bureau, Medical Research Council (United Kingdom), and Chang Jiang Scholars Program at the Ministry of Education of China.

Dr. Wu was previously The Pauline Gratz Professor of Nursing and Professor of Global Health at Duke University, where she served as Director for International Research in the School of Nursing.  She was also a Senior Fellow of the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development.  Dr. Wu is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education. She is an Advisory Professor at Fudan University and was a Visiting Chair Professor at Wuhan University, Shanghai University, and Jiangsu University.  Dr. Wu is President of the Geriatric Oral Health Group of the International Association for Dental Research and Chair of the Mentoring Committee at the Gerontological Society of America.

Specialties

Gerontology
Global

Publications

Publications

Aging and Global Health

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Aging and Long-term Care

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Associations Between Acculturation and Oral Health Among Older Chinese Immigrants in the United States

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Contributory behaviors and life satisfaction among Chinese older adults: Exploring variations by gender and living arrangements

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Defining Successful Aging: Perceptions From Elderly Chinese in Hawai‘i

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Dementia Caregiver Interventions in Chinese Population: A Systematic Review

Wu, B., Petrovsky , D. V., Wang, J., Xu, H., Zheng, Z., McConnell, E. S., & Corazzini, K. (2018). Journal of Advanced Nursing. 10.1111/jan.13865
Abstract
AimsThe aim of this systematic review was to examine the characteristics and efficacy of dementia caregiving interventions among the Chinese population.BackgroundIn recent years, an increasing number of dementia caregiving interventions have been developed for Chinese older adults living in Asia that aim to reduce caregivers’ burden, depression and distress and enhance quality of life. Little is known, however, on the nature and the efficacy of these interventions.DesignSystematic review with narrative summary.Data SourcesWe searched four databases for studies published in English between 1 January 1994 ‐ 30 December 2017. Nineteen studies reported in twenty‐three articles were included in the final analysis.Review MethodsWe used a set of criteria from the Cochrane Collaboration tool to assess for the risk of bias across studies.ResultsWe found that interventions varied in length, frequency, approach and content, making comparisons across studies challenging. Caregivers’ burden, depression and distress were improved among most included studies. All studies that examined quality of life of caregivers (N=6) showed improvement. Most of the interventions showed beneficial effects on care recipients’ behavioral symptoms, agitation and depression; cognitive function, however, failed to improve.ConclusionAlthough the review found mixed results on intervention outcomes, the majority of interventions showed a potential to improve the health and well‐being of dementia caregivers and care recipients. This review provides suggestions for future dementia caregiving research in the Chinese population, such as inclusion of relevant theoretical frameworks and more rigorous research designs.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Does Oral Health Predict Functional Status in Late Life? Findings From a National Sample

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End-of-Life Care Preference: Examination of Chinese Adults with Children and Those Who Lost Their Only Child

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The mediating roles of functional limitations and social support on the relationship between vision impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults

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The mediating roles of functional limitations and social support on the relationship between vision impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults

Gong, X., Ni, Z., & Wu, B. (2018). Ageing and Society. 10.1017/S0144686X18001010
Abstract
Vision impairment is prevalent and it is strongly associated with depressive symptoms in older adults. This study aimed to investigate the mediating roles of functional limitations and social support on the relationship between vision impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults. This study used data from a probability-based sample of 1,093 adults aged 60 and older in Shanghai, China. Structural equation models were used to examine the structural relationships among sets of variables simultaneously, including vision impairment, activities of daily living ADLs, instrumental ADLs (IADLs), friends support, family support, relatives support and depressive symptoms. The bootstrapping method and the program PRODCLIN were used to test the indirect effects of these variables. This study found that vision impairment was directly associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms, and the association was partially mediated by functional limitations (IADLs) and social support (friends support). The study demonstrates that improving social support from friends and enhancing social participation for visually impaired older adults can reduce depressive symptoms. More importantly, this study contributes to the knowledge of mediating mechanisms between vision impairment and depressive symptoms.