Daniel David

Faculty

Daniel David headshot

Daniel David

PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 212 992 5930
Accepting PhD students

Daniel David's additional information

Daniel David, RN, PhD, is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and National Palliative Care Center Kornfeld Scholar. His research investigates older adults and their informal caregivers in the context of serious illness. He is particularly interested in technology-based interventions that improve caregiving, communication, palliative care, and advance care planning.

David is the principal investigator of the PC-CRAFT Assisted Living Project (Palliative Care – Connecting Residents And Family through Technology), which uses video technology to support palliative care consultation between providers, residents of assisted living, and their informal caregivers.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, David was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Community Health Systems at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing and a postdoctoral fellow in the VA Quality Scholar Program in the UCSF Division of Geriatrics.

David received his PhD in nursing from Northeastern University, MS from the University of Colorado, and BSN from the University of Virginia.

PhD - Northeastern University
BSN - University of Virginia
MS - University of Colorado

Gerontology
Palliative care

American Geriatrics Society
Gerontological Society of America
Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
Palliative Care Research Cooperative
Sigma Theta Tau

Faculty Honors Awards

Junior Investigator, Palliative Care Research Consortium (2018)
VA Quality Scholar, VA Medical Center, San Francisco (2018)
Scholarship, End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (2017)
Sigma Theta Tau, Scholar Research Award, Northeastern University (2016)
Kaneb Foundation Research Award, Regis College (2015)
Scholar, Summer Genetics Institute, NINR, National Institute of Health (2014)
Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2014)
Sigma Theta Tau, Rising Star Award, Northeastern University (2013)
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Kappa (2004), Gamma Epsilon Chapter (2013)
Distinguished Nursing Student Award, University of Virginia (2005)
Raven Society, University of Virginia (2005)

Publications

Aliviado Mobile App for Hospice Providers: A Usability Study

David, D., Lin, S. Y., Groom, L. L., Ford, A., & Brody, A. A. (2022). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 63(1), e37-e45. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.07.019
Abstract
Abstract
Context: Evaluation of usability and mobile health content is critical for ensuring effective implementation of technology utilizing interventions tailored to the needs of hospice care providers for people living with dementia in community-based settings. Objectives: To evaluate the usability, content, and “readiness to launch” of the Aliviado mobile health app for interdisciplinary team members participating in the Hospice Advanced Dementia Symptom Management and Quality of Life. Methods: Usability of the Aliviado app was assessed in 86 respondents with an adapted IBM Computer Usability Satisfaction Questionnaire following Hospice Advanced Dementia Symptom Management and Quality of Life training and implementation of the mobile app. Results: More than half of users receiving training employed the mobile app in practice. Users reported use as: Daily-6.3%, Weekly-39.6%, monthly-54.2%. The highest measured attributes were usefulness, value, and effectiveness. Over 90% deemed the app “ready to launch” with no or minimal problems. Conclusion: This study shows that a newly-developed mobile app is usable and can be successfully adopted for care of people living with dementia.

Assessing Technical Feasibility and Acceptability of Telehealth Palliative Care in Nursing Homes

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A Controlled Pilot Study of the Wish Outcome Obstacle Plan Strategy for Spouses of Persons With Early-Stage Dementia

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Demystifying the National Institutes of Health diversity supplement: Mentee and mentor experiences and recommendations

Travers, J. L., David, D., Weir, M., Clark-Cutaia, M. N., Enwerem, N., Okunji, P. O., & Schulman-Green, D. (2022). Nursing Outlook, 70(6), 856-865. 10.1016/j.outlook.2022.07.007
Abstract
Abstract
Background: The National Institutes of Health supports professional development of diverse researchers through diversity supplements. Limited awareness and understanding of the application process have hindered utilization of this funding mechanism. Purpose: We describe perspectives and recommendations of mentee and mentor recipients of diversity supplements. Methods: Our working group, comprised of faculty from an Historically Black College and University and an R1 research university, conducted stakeholder interviews with three mentees and four mentors from various institutions. We used content analysis to derive categories of experiences and recommendations. Discussion: Interviewees reported on advantages of diversity supplements, ensuring institutional support, identifying a good mentee-mentor match, developing grantsmanship specific to diversity supplements, and increasing numbers of these applications. Conclusion: We identify opportunities for stakeholders to increase awareness of diversity supplements. Our data support greater understanding of this mechanism, establishing strong mentoring relationships, and submitting robust applications. Findings can enhance diversity among the scientific community.

National institutes of health diversity supplements: Perspectives from administrative insiders

David, D., Weir, M. L., Enwerem, N., Schulman-Green, D., Okunji, P. O., Travers, J. L., & Clark-Cutaia, M. N. (2022). Nursing Outlook, 70(6), 827-836. 10.1016/j.outlook.2022.08.006
Abstract
Abstract
Background: The NIH Diversity Administrative Supplement is a funding mechanism that provides support for diverse early-stage researchers. There is limited guidance on how to apply for these awards. Purpose: We describe perspectives of NIH program/diversity officers and university research administrators offering recommendations for diversity supplement submission. Methods: This article is the product of a working group exploring diversity in research. Nursing faculty from an R2 Historically Black College and University and an R1 research intensive university conducted stakeholder interviews with NIH program/diversity officers and university research administrators. We used content analysis to categorize respondents’ recommendations. Findings: Recommendations centered on harmonizing the applicant with the program announcement, communication with program/diversity officers, mentor/mentee relationship, scientific plan, and systematic institutional approaches to the diversity supplement. Discussion: Successful strategies in submitting diversity supplements will facilitate inclusion of diverse researchers in NIH-sponsored programs. Systematic approaches are needed to support development of diverse voices to enhance the scientific community.

Supporting dementia family care partners during COVID-19: Perspectives from hospice staff

Lin, S. Y., Jones, T., David, D., Lassell, R. K., Durga, A., Convery, K., Ford, A., & Brody, A. A. (2022). Geriatric Nursing, 47, 265-272. 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2022.08.003

“The Sun Came Up Because You Got Here…”: A Qualitative Exploration of Person-Centered Care Strategies Used by Adult Day Care Centers to Manage Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

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Engaging Nursing Assistants to Enhance Receptivity to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine

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Anxious, Depressed, and Planning for the Future: Advance Care Planning in Diverse Older Adults

McMahan, R. D., Barnes, D. E., Ritchie, C. S., Jin, C., Shi, Y., David, D., Walker, E. J., Tang, V. L., & Sudore, R. L. (2020). Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 68(11), 2638-2642. 10.1111/jgs.16754
Abstract
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether depression and anxiety are associated with advance care planning (ACP) engagement or values concerning future medical care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS: English- and Spanish-speaking patients, aged 55 years and older, from a San Francisco, CA, county hospital. MEASURES: Depression was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire 8-item scale, and anxiety was measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, using standardized cutoffs of 10 or more for moderate-to-severe symptoms. ACP engagement was measured using validated surveys of ACP behavior change (e.g., self-efficacy and readiness; mean five-point Likert score) and ACP actions (e.g., ask, discuss, and document wishes; 0- to 25-point scale), with higher scores representing higher engagement. In addition, we asked a question about valuing life extension (“some health situations would make life not worth living”). We used adjusted linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Mean age of 986 participants was 63 years, 81% were non-White, 39% had limited health literacy, 45% were Spanish speaking, 13% had depression, and 10% had anxiety. After adjustment for demographic and health status variables, participants who were depressed versus not depressed had higher ACP behavior change scores (0.2 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06–0.38; P =.007), higher ACP action scores (1.5 points; 95% CI = 0.51–2.57; P =.003), and higher odds of not valuing life extension (odds ratio (OR) = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.5–4.3; P <.001). Results were similar in participants with versus without anxiety (ACP behavior change: 0.2 points; 95% CI = 0.05–0.40; P =.01; ACP action scores: 1.2 points; 95% CI = 0.14–2.32; P =.028; odds of not valuing life extension: OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3–3.9; P =.004). CONCLUSION: Depression and anxiety were associated with greater ACP engagement and not valuing life extension. Although the direction of association between ACP engagement and values with anxiety and depression cannot be determined in this cross-sectional study, these conditions may influence ACP preferences. Future studies should assess whether changes in anxiety or depression affect ACP preferences over time.

Family Communication in Long-Term Care During a Pandemic: Lessons for Enhancing Emotional Experiences

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