Daniel David

Faculty

Daniel David headshot

Daniel David

PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 212 992 5930

433 First Ave
Room 422
New York, NY 10010
United States

Daniel David's additional information

Daniel David, RN, PhD, is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and National Palliative Care Center Kornfeld Scholar. His research investigates older adults and their informal caregivers in the context of serious illness. He is particularly interested in technology-based interventions that improve caregiving, communication, palliative care, and advance care planning.

David is the principal investigator of the PC-CRAFT Assisted Living Project (Palliative Care – Connecting Residents And Family through Technology), which uses video technology to support palliative care consultation between providers, residents of assisted living, and their informal caregivers.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, David was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Community Health Systems at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing and a postdoctoral fellow in the VA Quality Scholar Program in the UCSF Division of Geriatrics.

David received his PhD in nursing from Northeastern University, MS from the University of Colorado, and BSN from the University of Virginia.

PhD - Northeastern University
BSN - University of Virginia
MS - University of Colorado

Gerontology
Palliative care

American Geriatrics Society
Gerontological Society of America
Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
Palliative Care Research Cooperative
Sigma Theta Tau

Faculty Honors Awards

VA Quality Scholar, VA Medical Center, San Francisco (2018)
Junior Investigator, Palliative Care Research Consortium (2018)
Scholarship, End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (2017)
Sigma Theta Tau, Scholar Research Award, Northeastern University (2016)
Kaneb Foundation Research Award, Regis College (2015)
Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2014)
Scholar, Summer Genetics Institute, NINR, National Institute of Health (2014)
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Kappa (2004), Gamma Epsilon Chapter (2013)
Sigma Theta Tau, Rising Star Award, Northeastern University (2013)
Raven Society, University of Virginia (2005)
Distinguished Nursing Student Award, University of Virginia (2005)

Publications

Aliviado Mobile App for Hospice Providers: A Usability Study

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A Controlled Pilot Study of the Wish Outcome Obstacle Plan Strategy for Spouses of Persons With Early-Stage Dementia

Monin, J. K., Oettingen, G., Laws, H., David, D., DeMatteo, L., & Marottoli, R. (2022). The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 77(3), 513-524. 10.1093/geronb/gbab115
Abstract
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Behavioral interventions can reduce distress for couples coping with early-stage dementia. However, most interventions are limited in accessibility and fail to address individualized goals. This pilot study examined the dyadic effects on multiple indicators of well-being of the Wish Outcome Obstacle Plan (WOOP) intervention, which guides participants to use Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions to achieve attainable goals in their daily lives. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included 45 older persons with early-stage dementia (PWD) and their spousal care partners (CPs: n = 90 individuals). CPs were assigned randomly to WOOP training immediately after baseline (WOOP) or after a 3-month follow-up interview (Control; CON). Both groups received a dementia care education booklet. WOOP CPs were instructed to practice WOOP at least once a day for 2 weeks. All CPs and PWDs completed home surveys (baseline, 2 weeks, and 3 months), measuring perceived stress, depressive symptoms, quality of life, and affect. RESULTS: Mixed-effects models showed significant intervention × time interaction effects with large effect sizes for CPs on three of the five outcomes over 3 months. Compared with CON, WOOP CPs had decreased perceived stress (δ = 1.71) and increased quality of life (δ = 1.55) and positive affect (δ = 2.30). WOOP PWD showed decreased perceived stress (δ = 0.87) and increased quality of life (δ = 1.26), but these effects were not statistically significant. DISCUSSION: WOOP is a promising, brief intervention to improve dementia CPs' well-being that may also positively affect their partners with dementia.

Engaging Nursing Assistants to Enhance Receptivity to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine

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Anxious, Depressed, and Planning for the Future: Advance Care Planning in Diverse Older Adults

McMahan, R. D., Barnes, D. E., Ritchie, C. S., Jin, C., Shi, Y., David, D., Walker, E. J., Tang, V. L., & Sudore, R. L. (2020). Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 68(11), 2638-2642. 10.1111/jgs.16754
Abstract
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether depression and anxiety are associated with advance care planning (ACP) engagement or values concerning future medical care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS: English- and Spanish-speaking patients, aged 55 years and older, from a San Francisco, CA, county hospital. MEASURES: Depression was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire 8-item scale, and anxiety was measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, using standardized cutoffs of 10 or more for moderate-to-severe symptoms. ACP engagement was measured using validated surveys of ACP behavior change (e.g., self-efficacy and readiness; mean five-point Likert score) and ACP actions (e.g., ask, discuss, and document wishes; 0- to 25-point scale), with higher scores representing higher engagement. In addition, we asked a question about valuing life extension (“some health situations would make life not worth living”). We used adjusted linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Mean age of 986 participants was 63 years, 81% were non-White, 39% had limited health literacy, 45% were Spanish speaking, 13% had depression, and 10% had anxiety. After adjustment for demographic and health status variables, participants who were depressed versus not depressed had higher ACP behavior change scores (0.2 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06–0.38; P =.007), higher ACP action scores (1.5 points; 95% CI = 0.51–2.57; P =.003), and higher odds of not valuing life extension (odds ratio (OR) = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.5–4.3; P <.001). Results were similar in participants with versus without anxiety (ACP behavior change: 0.2 points; 95% CI = 0.05–0.40; P =.01; ACP action scores: 1.2 points; 95% CI = 0.14–2.32; P =.028; odds of not valuing life extension: OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3–3.9; P =.004). CONCLUSION: Depression and anxiety were associated with greater ACP engagement and not valuing life extension. Although the direction of association between ACP engagement and values with anxiety and depression cannot be determined in this cross-sectional study, these conditions may influence ACP preferences. Future studies should assess whether changes in anxiety or depression affect ACP preferences over time.

Family Communication in Long-Term Care During a Pandemic: Lessons for Enhancing Emotional Experiences

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Family- And person-centered interdisciplinary telehealth: Policy and practice implications following onset of the COVID-19 pandemic

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Original Research: Understanding Nursing Home Staff Attitudes Toward Death and Dying: A Survey

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“They Don’t Trust Us”: The Influence of Perceptions of Inadequate Nursing Home Care on Emergency Department Transfers and the Potential Role for Telehealth

Stephens, C. E., Halifax, E., David, D., Bui, N., Lee, S. J., Shim, J., & Ritchie, C. S. (2020). Clinical Nursing Research, 29(3), 157-168. 10.1177/1054773819835015
Abstract
Abstract
In this descriptive, qualitative study, we conducted eight focus groups with diverse informal and formal caregivers to explore their experiences/challenges with nursing home (NH) to emergency department (ED) transfers and whether telehealth might be able to mitigate some of those concerns. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Transfers were commonly viewed as being influenced by a perceived lack of trust in NH care/capabilities and driven by four main factors: questioning the quality of NH nurses’ assessments, perceptions that physicians were absent from the NH, misunderstandings of the capabilities of NHs and EDs, and perceptions that responses to medical needs were inadequate. Participants believed technology could provide “the power of the visual” permitting virtual assessment for the off-site physician, validation of nursing assessment, “real time” assurance to residents and families, better goals of care discussions with multiple parties in different locations, and family ability to say goodbye.

Living Wills: One Part of the Advance Care Planning Puzzle

David, D., McMahan, R. D., & Sudore, R. L. (2019). Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 67(1), 9-10. 10.1111/jgs.15688

The quality of family relationships, diabetes self-care, and health outcomes in older adults

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