Daniel David

Faculty

Daniel David headshot

Daniel David

PhD RN

Assistant Professor

1 212 992 5930

Daniel David's additional information

Daniel David, RN, PhD, is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and National Palliative Care Center Kornfeld Scholar. His research investigates older adults and their informal caregivers in the context of serious illness. He is particularly interested in technology-based interventions that improve caregiving, communication, palliative care, and advance care planning.

David is the principal investigator of the PC-CRAFT Assisted Living Project (Palliative Care – Connecting Residents And Family through Technology), which uses video technology to support palliative care consultation between providers, residents of assisted living, and their informal caregivers.

Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, David was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Community Health Systems at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing and a postdoctoral fellow in the VA Quality Scholar Program in the UCSF Division of Geriatrics.

David received his PhD in nursing from Northeastern University, MS from the University of Colorado, and BSN from the University of Virginia.

PhD - Northeastern University
BSN - University of Virginia
MS - University of Colorado

Gerontology
Palliative care

American Geriatrics Society
Gerontological Society of America
Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
Palliative Care Research Cooperative
Sigma Theta Tau

Faculty Honors Awards

VA Quality Scholar, VA Medical Center, San Francisco (2018)
Junior Investigator, Palliative Care Research Consortium (2018)
Scholarship, End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (2017)
Sigma Theta Tau, Scholar Research Award, Northeastern University (2016)
Kaneb Foundation Research Award, Regis College (2015)
Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2014)
Scholar, Summer Genetics Institute, NINR, National Institute of Health (2014)
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Kappa (2004), Gamma Epsilon Chapter (2013)
Sigma Theta Tau, Rising Star Award, Northeastern University (2013)
Distinguished Nursing Student Award, University of Virginia (2005)
Raven Society, University of Virginia (2005)

Publications

Aliviado Mobile App for Hospice Providers: A Usability Study

David, D., Lin, S. Y., Groom, L. L., Ford, A., & Brody, A. A. (2021). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.07.019
Abstract
Abstract
Context: Evaluation of usability and mobile health content is critical for ensuring effective implementation of technology utilizing interventions tailored to the needs of hospice care providers for people living with dementia in community-based settings. Objectives: To evaluate the usability, content, and “readiness to launch” of the Aliviado mobile health app for interdisciplinary team members participating in the Hospice Advanced Dementia Symptom Management and Quality of Life. Methods: Usability of the Aliviado app was assessed in 86 respondents with an adapted IBM Computer Usability Satisfaction Questionnaire following Hospice Advanced Dementia Symptom Management and Quality of Life training and implementation of the mobile app. Results: More than half of users receiving training employed the mobile app in practice. Users reported use as: Daily-6.3%, Weekly-39.6%, monthly-54.2%. The highest measured attributes were usefulness, value, and effectiveness. Over 90% deemed the app “ready to launch” with no or minimal problems. Conclusion: This study shows that a newly-developed mobile app is usable and can be successfully adopted for care of people living with dementia.

Engaging Nursing Assistants to Enhance Receptivity to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine

Sadarangani, T. R., David, D., & Travers, J. (2021). Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 22(6), 1125-1127. 10.1016/j.jamda.2021.03.016

Anxious, Depressed, and Planning for the Future: Advance Care Planning in Diverse Older Adults

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Family Communication in Long-Term Care During a Pandemic: Lessons for Enhancing Emotional Experiences

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Family- And person-centered interdisciplinary telehealth: Policy and practice implications following onset of the COVID-19 pandemic

Brody, A. A., Sadarangani, T., Jones, T. M., Convery, K., Groom, L., Bristol, A. A., & David, D. (2020). Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 46(9), 9-13. 10.3928/00989134-20200811-03
Abstract
Abstract
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth was thrust to the forefront, becoming one of the most predominant forms of care almost overnight. Despite years of research, practice, and policymaking, tenets for providing telehealth in an interdisciplinary, family- and person-centered fashion, and across a wide breadth of settings remain underdeveloped. In addition, although telehealth has the potential to increase equity in care, it can also further exacerbate disparities. The current article discusses the opening created by the pandemic and provides recommendations for how to make permanent changes in telehealth policy and practice to allow for interdisciplinary, person- and family-centered care while also taking care to address issues of equity and ethics and privacy issues related to telehealth and remote monitoring. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 46(9), 9-13.]

Original Research: Understanding Nursing Home Staff Attitudes Toward Death and Dying: A Survey

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“They Don’t Trust Us”: The Influence of Perceptions of Inadequate Nursing Home Care on Emergency Department Transfers and the Potential Role for Telehealth

Stephens, C. E., Halifax, E., David, D., Bui, N., Lee, S. J., Shim, J., & Ritchie, C. S. (2020). Clinical Nursing Research, 29(3), 157-168. 10.1177/1054773819835015
Abstract
Abstract
In this descriptive, qualitative study, we conducted eight focus groups with diverse informal and formal caregivers to explore their experiences/challenges with nursing home (NH) to emergency department (ED) transfers and whether telehealth might be able to mitigate some of those concerns. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Transfers were commonly viewed as being influenced by a perceived lack of trust in NH care/capabilities and driven by four main factors: questioning the quality of NH nurses’ assessments, perceptions that physicians were absent from the NH, misunderstandings of the capabilities of NHs and EDs, and perceptions that responses to medical needs were inadequate. Participants believed technology could provide “the power of the visual” permitting virtual assessment for the off-site physician, validation of nursing assessment, “real time” assurance to residents and families, better goals of care discussions with multiple parties in different locations, and family ability to say goodbye.

Living Wills: One Part of the Advance Care Planning Puzzle

David, D., McMahan, R. D., & Sudore, R. L. (2019). Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 67(1), 9-10. 10.1111/jgs.15688

The quality of family relationships, diabetes self-care, and health outcomes in older adults

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Rehabbed to death

Flint, L. A., David, D. J., & Smith, A. K. (2019). New England Journal of Medicine, 380(5), 408-409. 10.1056/NEJMp1809354