Dorothy J Wholihan

Faculty

Dorothy J Wholihan headshot

Dorothy J Wholihan

ACHPN AGACNP-BC DNP GNP-BC

Clinical Professor
Program Director, Advanced Practice Palliative Care Specialty Sequence

1 212 992 9429

Dorothy J Wholihan's additional information

Dorothy J. Wholihan, ACHPN, AGACNP-BC, GNP-BC, DNP, is the director of the Advanced Practice Palliative Care Specialty Sequence Program and a clinical associate professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. She is a palliative care nurse practitioner with over 30 years of nursing experience. She has practiced as an oncology and pain management clinical nurse specialist and is actively practicing as a nurse practitioner in palliative care. Her practice and research interests include spiritual aspects of care, teaching communication skills, and the care of veterans at end of life.

Wholihan received her DNP from George Washington University, MSN from Yale University, and BSN from the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Post-Master's Certificate from Christian Specialty, General Theological Seminary, and a Post-Master's Certificate ANP from Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences.

DNP - George Washington University (2011)
Post-Master's Certificate - Christian Specialty, General Theological Seminary (2008)
Post-Master's Certificate, ANP - Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences (1999)
MSN - Yale University (1989)
BSN - University of Pennsylvania (1983)

Palliative care

American Association of Nurse Practitioners
American Nurses Association
Hospice and Palliative Nursing Association
National Faculty Member, End of Life Nursing Education Consortium
Sigma Theta Tau

Faculty Honors Awards

Distinguished Teaching Award, NYU Meyers (2019)
Fellow, American Academy of Nursing
Fellow, Palliative Care Nursing

Publications

American Academy of Nursing Expert Panel consensus statement on nursing's roles in ensuring universal palliative care access

Rosa, W. E., Buck, H. G., Squires, A. P., Kozachik, S. L., Huijer, H. A. S., Bakitas, M., Boit, J. M. G., Bradley, P. K., Cacchione, P. Z., Chan, G. K., Crisp, N., Dahlin, C., Daoust, P., Davidson, P. M., Davis, S., Doumit, M. A., Fink, R. M., Herr, K. A., Hinds, P. S., Hughes, T. L., Karanja, V., Kenny, D. J., King, C. R., Klopper, H. C., Knebel, A. R., Kurth, A. E., Madigan, E. A., Malloy, P., Matzo, M., Mazanec, P., Meghani, S. H., Monroe, T. B., Moreland, P. J., Paice, J. A., Phillips, J. C., Rushton, C. H., Shamian, J., Shattell, M., Snethen, J. A., Ulrich, C. M., Wholihan, D., Wocial, L. D., & Ferrell, B. R. (2021). Nursing Outlook. 10.1016/j.outlook.2021.06.011
Abstract
Abstract
The purpose of this consensus paper was to convene leaders and scholars from eight Expert Panels of the American Academy of Nursing and provide recommendations to advance nursing's roles and responsibility to ensure universal access to palliative care. Part I of this consensus paper herein provides the rationale and background to support the policy, education, research, and clinical practice recommendations put forward in Part II. On behalf of the Academy, the evidence-based recommendations will guide nurses, policy makers, government representatives, professional associations, and interdisciplinary and community partners to integrate palliative nursing services across health and social care settings. The consensus paper's 43 authors represent eight countries (Australia, Canada, England, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, South Africa, United States of America) and extensive international health experience, thus providing a global context for the subject matter. The authors recommend greater investments in palliative nursing education and nurse-led research, nurse engagement in policy making, enhanced intersectoral partnerships with nursing, and an increased profile and visibility of palliative nurses worldwide. By enacting these recommendations, nurses working in all settings can assume leading roles in delivering high-quality palliative care globally, particularly for minoritized, marginalized, and other at-risk populations.

International consensus-based policy recommendations to advance universal palliative care access from the American Academy of Nursing Expert Panels

Rosa, W. E., Buck, H. G., Squires, A. P., Kozachik, S. L., Huijer, H. A. S., Bakitas, M., Boit, J. M. G., Bradley, P. K., Cacchione, P. Z., Chan, G. K., Crisp, N., Dahlin, C., Daoust, P., Davidson, P. M., Davis, S., Doumit, M. A., Fink, R. M., Herr, K. A., Hinds, P. S., Hughes, T. L., Karanja, V., Kenny, D. J., King, C. R., Klopper, H. C., Knebel, A. R., Kurth, A. E., Madigan, E. A., Malloy, P., Matzo, M., Mazanec, P., Meghani, S. H., Monroe, T. B., Moreland, P. J., Paice, J. A., Phillips, J. C., Rushton, C. H., Shamian, J., Shattell, M., Snethen, J. A., Ulrich, C. M., Wholihan, D., Wocial, L. D., & Ferrell, B. R. (2021). Nursing Outlook. 10.1016/j.outlook.2021.06.018
Abstract
Abstract
The purpose of this consensus paper was to convene leaders and scholars from eight Expert Panels of the American Academy of Nursing and provide recommendations to advance nursing's roles and responsibility to ensure universal access to palliative care. On behalf of the Academy, these evidence-based recommendations will guide nurses, policy makers, government representatives, professional associations, and interdisciplinary and community partners to integrate palliative nursing services across health and social care settings. Through improved palliative nursing education, nurse-led research, nurse engagement in policy making, enhanced intersectoral partnerships with nursing, and an increased profile and visibility of palliative care nurses worldwide, nurses can assume leading roles in delivering high-quality palliative care globally, particularly for minoritized, marginalized, and other at-risk populations. Part II herein provides a summary of international responses and policy options that have sought to enhance universal palliative care and palliative nursing access to date. Additionally, we provide ten policy, education, research, and clinical practice recommendations based on the rationale and background information found in Part I. The consensus paper's 43 authors represent eight countries (Australia, Canada, England, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, South Africa, United States of America) and extensive international health experience, thus providing a global context for the subject matter.

Palliative Nursing: The Core of COVID-19 Care

Paice, J. A., Wholihan, D., Dahlin, C., Rosa, W. E., Mazanec, P., Long, C. O., Thaxton, C., & Greer, K. (2021). Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 23(1), 6-8. 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000709

 Palliative care for people with COVID-19 related symptoms.

Paice, J. A., Wholihan, D., Mazanec, P., Long, C., Thaxton, C., & Greer, K. (2020). Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 421-427.

 Palliative nursing: the core of COVID-19 care

Paice, J. A., Wholihan, D., Dahlin, C., Rosa, W. E., Mazanec, P., Long, C., Thaxton, C., & Greer, K. (2020). Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing.

Psychological Issues of Patient Transition from Intensive Care to Palliative Care

Wholihan, D. (2019). Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 31(4), 547-556. 10.1016/j.cnc.2019.07.010
Abstract
Abstract
End-of-life care in the intensive care unit is fraught with complicated psychological responses by patients, families, and staff. Empathic and mindful communication, inclusion of all integral staff in decision-making meetings, and multidimensional support of patients and families can ease the transition away from aggressive life-prolonging to comfort-oriented end of life care. Primary palliative care communication strategies can help clarify goals of care and facilitate transitions. Early integration of specialist palliative care is recommended.

 Anorexia-cachexia syndrome. 

Schack, E., & Wholihan, D. (2019). In Textbook of Palliative Care Nursing (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press.

A Framework for Integrating Oncology Palliative Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Education

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Access to Hospice Care.

Wholihan, D. (2017). In The Encyclopedia of Elder Care (4th ed.).. Springer Publishing.

The doctrine of double effect: A review for the bedside nurse providing end-of-life care

Wholihan, D., & Olson, E. (2017). Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 19(3), 205-211. 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000348
Abstract
Abstract
Nurses on the front lines of palliative care are frequently presented with ethically challenging situations involving the use of palliative sedation and increasing opioids at the end of life. The doctrine of double effect is an ethical principle dating back to the 13th century that explains how the bad consequences of an action can be considered ethically justified if the original intent was for good intention. This article examines the doctrine of double effect through case examples and presents supporting and opposing opinions about its relevance to clinical practice. Implications for nursing care are discussed.