Faculty

Dorothy J. Wholihan

Dorothy J. Wholihan

Clinical Associate Professor
Program Director, Advanced Certificate in Palliative Care

1 212 992 9429

433 First Avenue
Room 533
New York, NY 10010
United States

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Professional overview

Dorothy Wholihan is a palliative care nurse practitioner with 28 years of nursing experience. She has practiced as an oncology and pain management clinical nurse specialist and a nurse practitioner in palliative care. Dorothy's practice and research interests include spiritual aspects of care and the care of veterans at end of life.

Education
DNP 2011, George Washington University
Post-Master's Certificate, 2008, Christian Specialty, General Theological Seminary
Post-Master's Certificate: ANP, 1999, Uniformed Services University of the Heath Sciences
MSN, 1989, Yale University
BSN, 1983, University of Pennsylvania
Specialties
Palliative care
Publications

Anorexia and cachexia

Wholihan, D., & Kemp, C. (2010). Oxford textbook of palliative nursing, 211-220,

Palliative Care

Wholihan, D., & Sherman, D.W. (2008). Encyclopedia of elder care: The comprehensive resource on geriatric and social care, 606-609,

The value of reminiscence in hospice care

Wholihan, D. (2006). American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, 9, 33-35, 10.1177/104990919200900210

The "VANAC team": establishing a cancer prevention team. VA Nurses Against Cancer.

Genovese, L., & Wholihan, D. (1995). Cancer nursing, 18, 421-6,
Abstract

Nurses recognize the increasing need to focus on primary and secondary prevention of cancer, yet the demands of current staffing prohibit many nurses from organizing and/or participating in cancer prevention and detection activities. This article describes an innovative program established at the Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VA). Funded by an American Cancer Society professional education grant, nurses at the Bronx VA formed the "VANAC" Team (VA Nurses Against Cancer). The camaraderie of a team approach invited generalist nurses to become involved with the program. The formation and activities of the team are described. After an intensive orientation, nurses participated in a wide range of educational activities, including patient education, staff seminars, and community presentations. The logistics of arranging such a program are discussed and recommendations for future direction are offered. It is hoped that nurses in other institutions can adapt the VANAC approach to their individual settings, thereby increasing the number of nurses involved in cancer prevention.

Home health in rural Kenya

Wholihan, D. (1993). Home Healthcare Nurse, 11, 47-50,
Abstract

Despite the many environmental and cultural differences, many similarities exist between home health nursing in Kenya and the United States. Family-focused care is the goal, with emphasis on education and prevention.

Incorporating cancer prevention interventions into the home health visit

Wholihan, D.J. (1991). Home Healthcare Nurse, 9, 19-24,

A patient-education tool for patient-controlled analgesia.

Wholihan, D. Oncology nursing forum, 24, 1801-4,
Abstract

To develop a pamphlet for educating patients about patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).