Komal Patel Murali

Faculty

Komal Murali headshot

Komal Patel Murali

ACNP-BC PhD RN

1 212 998 5783

Komal Patel Murali's additional information

Komal Patel Murali, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC is an assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing interested in end-of-life care for seriously ill older adults across healthcare settings including home healthcare and critical care. She has used quantitative assessments to study palliative and end-of-life care outcomes and complex care needs of seriously ill older adults by conducting secondary data analysis of clinical trial, electronical medical record, and administrative claims data. Current research focuses on improving end-of-life care in the home healthcare setting, specifically surrounding hospice care transitions for diverse persons living with dementia and their care partners. Prof. Murali is also interested in palliative care integration in the ICU, which is informed by her clinical experiences in neuroscience and medical critical care. Prior to joining the faculty at NYU Meyers, Murali was a T32 postdoctoral research fellow in the Comparative and Cost-Effectiveness Research Training Program for Nurse Scientists (T32NR0114205) at Columbia Nursing. Murali was awarded a TL1 predoctoral scholarship from the NYU Clinical and Translational Science Institute to complete her PhD in Nursing Research and Theory Development at NYU Meyers in 2020 (UL1TR001445/TL1TR001447).

PhD – New York University (2020)
MSN – University of Pennsylvania (2011)
BSN – University of Pennsylvania (2008)

Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
Palliative Care Research Cooperative
American Geriatrics Society
Eastern Nursing Research Society
American Association of Critical Care Nurses
Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society
Gerontological Society of America

Faculty Honors Awards

Co-Chair, Early Career Investigators SIG, Palliative Care Research Cooperative (2023)
Editorial Board Member, Research in Gerontological Nursing (2022)
Emerging Leaders Award, Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation (2022)
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging Task Force, Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (2022)
Co-Chair, Early Career Investigators SIG, Palliative Care Research Cooperative (2022)
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging Task Force, Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (2021)
Co-Chair, Early Career Investigators SIG, Palliative Care Research Cooperative (2021)
Jonas Nurse Leader Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2020)
Distinguished PhD Student Award, NYU Meyers (2020)
Co-Founder and Lead Peer Mentoring POD Initiative, NYU Meyers (2019)
Jonas Nurse Leader Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2019)
2nd Place, Early PhD Poster Presentation, Eastern Nursing Research Society (2018)
President’s Service Award, New York University (2018)
Jonas Nurse Leader Scholar, Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence (2018)
President, Doctoral Student Organization, NYU Meyers (2018)
Norman Volk Doctoral Scholarship, NYU Meyers (2018)
Co-Founder and Lead Peer Mentoring POD Initiative, NYU Meyers (2018)
President, Doctoral Student Organization, NYU Meyers (2017)
Co-Founder and Lead Peer Mentoring POD Initiative, NYU Meyers (2017)
Sigma Theta Tau Inductee, University of Pennsylvania (2008)
Mary D. Naylor Graduation Research Award, University of Pennsylvania (2008)

Publications

Clinicians' views on the use of triggers for specialist palliative care in the ICU: A qualitative secondary analysis

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Interpersonal Conflict between Clinicians in the Delivery of Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Critically Ill Patients: A Secondary Qualitative Analysis

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Measuring Palliative Care-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Confidence in Home Health Care Clinicians, Patients, and Caregivers: A Systematic Review

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What End-of-Life Communication in ICUs Around the World Teaches Us About Shared Decision-Making

Murali, K. P., & Hua, M. (2022). Chest, 162(5), 949-950. 10.1016/j.chest.2022.07.001

What End-of-Life Communication in ICUs Around the World Teaches Us About Shared Decision-Making?

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Association of Infection-Related Hospitalization with Cognitive Impairment among Nursing Home Residents

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Implementation of Specialist Palliative Care and Outcomes for Hospitalized Patients with Dementia

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Latent Class Analysis of Symptom Burden Among Seriously Ill Adults at the End of Life

Murali, K. P., Yu, G., Merriman, J. D., Vorderstrasse, A., Kelley, A. S., & Brody, A. A. (2021). Nursing Research, 70(6), 443-454. 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000549
Abstract
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Serious illness is characterized by high symptom burden that negatively affects quality of life (QOL). Although palliative care research has highlighted symptom burden in seriously ill adults with cancer, symptom burden among those with noncancer serious illness and multiple chronic conditions has been understudied. Latent class analysis is a statistical method that can be used to better understand the relationship between severity of symptom burden and covariates, such as the presence of multiple chronic conditions. Although latent class analysis has been used to highlight subgroups of seriously ill adults with cancer based on symptom clusters, none have incorporated multiple chronic conditions. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to (a) describe the demographic and baseline characteristics of seriously ill adults at the end of life in a palliative care cohort, (b) identify latent subgroups of seriously ill individuals based on severity of symptom burden, and (c) examine variables associated with latent subgroup membership, such as QOL, functional status, and the presence of multiple chronic conditions. METHODS: A secondary data analysis of a palliative care clinical trial was conducted. The latent class analysis was based on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, which measures nine symptoms on a scale of 0-10 (e.g., pain, fatigue, nausea, depression, anxiousness, drowsiness, appetite, well-being, and shortness of breath). Clinically significant cut-points for symptom severity were used to categorize each symptom item in addition to a categorized total score. RESULTS: Three latent subgroups were identified (e.g., low, moderate, and high symptom burden). Lower overall QOL was associated with membership in the moderate and high symptom burden subgroups. Multiple chronic conditions were associated with statistically significant membership in the high symptom burden latent subgroup. Older adults between 65 and 74 years had a lower likelihood of moderate or high symptom burden subgroup membership compared to the low symptom burden class. DISCUSSION: Lower QOL was associated with high symptom burden. Multiple chronic conditions were associated with high symptom burden, which underlines the clinical complexity of serious illness. Palliative care at the end of life for seriously ill adults with high symptom burden must account for the presence of multiple chronic conditions.

Multiple Chronic Conditions among Seriously Ill Adults Receiving Palliative Care

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The Role of Regional and State Initiatives in Nursing Home Advance Care Planning Policies

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